Crossing


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crossing

1. a place, often shown by markings, lights, or poles, where a street, railway, etc., may be crossed
2. the intersection of the nave and transept in a church
3. the act or process of crossbreeding

Crossing

The square space of a cruciform church, created by the intersection of the nave and chancel with the transept. Intersection of two elements in the form of a cross, such as the ridges of a cross gable.

Crossing

 

a ventilation device installed in underground mine workings and designed to separate and isolate intersecting flows of air, such as fresh air and exhaust air. Depending on the airflow and period of service, crossings may be made of metal and concrete piping or in the form of a well-secured bypass shaft driven through the rock in the roof or soil of the bed.


Crossing

 

(also interbreeding or hybridizing), one of the methods of the selective breeding of plants and animals. Crossing is used to obtain hybrids and crossbreeds that represent the initial material in selection and culling for economically beneficial characteristics. It is also used in the development of new breeds and varieties.

The various systems of crossing can be classified in one of two categories: inbreeding and outbreeding. Variants of outbreeding include crossbreeding, incrossing (crossing inbred lines of the same breed or variety), incrossbreeding (crossing inbred lines of different breeds or varieties), topcross (crossing specially selected inbred male lines with outbred female lines), and more remote crossings. In animal breeding, crossing is understood to mean crossbreeding, which is divided into induced crossbreeding, reproductive crossing, grading up, and commercial crossbreeding. (See alsoHYBRIDIZATION.)


Crossing

 

in medieval, primarily Romanesque and Gothic, churches, the place where the nave and transept intersect.

crossing

1. In a church, the place where the nave and chancel cross the transept.
2. A painting technique whereby freshly applied paint is rebrushed at right angles to the direction of application and then rebrushed at right angles again to provide even distribution of paint over the surface.
3. Same as crossbanding.
References in classic literature ?
During that burning day when we were crossing Iowa, our talk kept returning to a central figure, a Bohemian girl whom we had known long ago and whom both of us admired.
In another instant the tree was deserted; the figures of the five millionaires of Devil's Ford, crossing the fierce glare of the open space, with boyish alacrity, glistened in the sunlight, and then disappeared in the nearest fringe of thickets.
I can easily walk ten, fifteen, twenty, any number of miles, commencing at my own door, without going by any house, without crossing a road except where the fox and the mink do: first along by the river, and then the brook, and then the meadow and the woodside.
The sun rose while they were crossing the moor, a dazzle of light over the tops of the hills.
We were twenty days upon the road, crossing two sea bottoms and passing through or around a number of ruined cities, mostly smaller than Korad.
To risk the crossing under their eyes would have meant undoubted capture.
I shall never forget the last glimpse which I had of the inn yard and its crowd of picturesque figures,all crossing themselves, as they stood round the wide archway, with its background of rich foliage of oleander and orange trees in green tubs clustered in the centre of the yard.
After crossing a river, you should get far away from it.
They are, in fact, notorious marauders and horse- stealers; crossing and re-crossing the mountains, robbing on the one side, and conveying their spoils to the other.
Each animal had dangling to its tail a bag to receive its excrement, the only fuel on which the caravans can depend when crossing the desert.
23 the Russian troops were crossing the river Enns.
It has often been loosely said that all our races of dogs have been produced by the crossing of a few aboriginal species; but by crossing we can get only forms in some degree intermediate between their parents; and if we account for our several domestic races by this process, we must admit the former existence of the most extreme forms, as the Italian greyhound, bloodhound, bull-dog, in the wild state.