cryptochromes


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cryptochromes

[′krip·tə‚krōm]
(cell and molecular biology)
Light-sensitive proteins found in both plants and animals that detect and change conformation in response to blue light; in animals, they play an important role in circadian rhythm.
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Cryptochromes are blue light receptors linked to a flavin and pterine, and responsible for mediating various plant responses, such as regulation of circadian rhythms, depolarization of membranes, anthocyanins production, and other effects (Yu, Liu, Klejnot, & Lin, 2010).
Molecules known as cryptochromes, found within avian retinas, may be behind birds' uncanny navigational skills (SN: 5/9/09, p.
Differential regulation of mammalian period genes and circadian rhythmicity by cryptochromes 1 and 2," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
One possibility is that cryptochromes play a functional role in the detection of weak magnetic radiation or photons, the process being based on a hypothetical radical-pair mechanism (Gegear, Foley, Casselman, & Reppert, 2010; Johnsen & Lohmann, 2005; Maeda et al.
Another involves structures called cryptochromes in the right eyes of birds.
In a paper published last week in Nature, scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies report finding that proteins that control the body's biological rhythms, known as cryptochromes, also interact with metabolic switches that are targeted by certain anti-inflammatory drugs.
Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies found that proteins that control the body's biological rhythms, known as cryptochromes, also interact with metabolic switches that are targeted by certain anti-inflammatory drugs.
The foundation cited O'Neill's work in describing the mechanism of action of cryptochromes as circadian photoreceptors at the molecular and cellular level.
Meanwhile, the blue-light receptor cryptochromes, which are flavoproteins in numerous plants and animals, are proposed to be the +magnetoreceptors.
Light-dependent development of plants involve the combined action of several important photoreceptors including the red/far-red light-absorbing phytochromes (Quail, 1995), the blue/UV-A light absorbing cryptochromes (Ahmad and Cashmore, 1996), and distinct UV-A (Young et al.
If cryptochromes or other chemicals in a bird's eye behave as the new molecule does, they could provide the foundation of a bird's magnetic sense.
Indeed, the far more abundant blue photons in the treatment with the higher photosynthetic energy will be absorbed by cryptochromes, the blue photoreceptors present in plants which control stem elongation and leaf expansion.