strong encryption

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strong encryption

An encryption method that uses a very large number as its cryptographic key. The larger the key, the longer it takes to unlawfully break the code. Today, 256 bits is considered strong encryption. As computers become faster, the length of the key must be increased.
References in periodicals archive ?
Enterprises can now create and use cryptographically strong passwords when using TrueCrypt for data protection.
They are called cryptographically strong algorithms, and their output passes every statistical test that can be performed in a feasible amount of computer time to distinguish random numbers from numbers that fall into a pattern.
If you used a cryptographically strong algorithm to shuffle decks of cards on an online gambling site, then even after I played hundreds of poker hands, I wouldn't be able to predict anything at all about the next hand" says Wagner.
Given current computer capabilities and the state of the science of cryptanalysis, cryptographically strong encodings are so complex that performing them by hand is no longer feasible.
We are very pleased to expand our total security offering with the addition of a new, cryptographically strong TRNG which is compliant with the newest FIPS 140 draft standard," said Dr.
Attacking long, complex cryptographically strong passwords is a lengthy and time-consuming operation.
His research has led to the development of key topics including cryptographically strong pseudo random number generators, probabilistic encryption, zero knowledge proofs, multi-party computation, fair public-key escrow systems and chosen message attack secure digital signatures.
Has no way to verify that each of your privileged account passwords is cryptographically strong, sufficiently unique, and changed often enough to be secure.
NET deployments, few organizations can document the presence of each hard-coded credential - let alone ensure that all passwords are cryptographically strong, frequently changed, and known only to authorized personnel.
0 employs its own cryptographically strong random number generator and a powerful combination of symmetric and asymmetric algorithms to encrypt and decrypt archived data.

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