Czardas

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Czardas

 

a Hungarian folk dance performed by couples to 2/4 time. The czardas, which appeared in the mid-19th century, consists of one slow section and one fast, impetuous section. It has syncopated rhythms, and many steps are improvised. The czardas served as the basis of ballroom dance that became popular in Russia in the early 20th century as the vengerka. Musical reworkings of the czardas are found in Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsodies, Brahms’ Hungarian Dances, Delibes’s Coppélia, and Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake.

References in periodicals archive ?
27, as well as three works by Franz Liszt: Csardas Obstine; 'Mephisto' Waltz No.
By the early twentieth century, the full settlement of dualism had changed the situation, but the need to express a national consciousness and the pride of being equal to the Austrians was present and found its way into popular forms of culture like the operetta, for which a world-famous example is Imre Kalman's Csardas Queen.
S 15 in Manhattan crowed that some sixty "healthy, happy" fifth-grade girls in the Burchenal Athletic Club regularly performed fifteen Northern European dances, from the Irish Jig to the Hungarian Csardas, Swedish Frykdalspolkska, Russian Comarinskaia and a Minuet.
But that hasn't stopped Csardas from being a kind of Hungarian headquarters in Los Angeles for a number of years, drawing heavily from the expatriate Hungarian community here as well as a few tourists and the curious, adventurous local foodies who want to experience an authentic Hungarian meal.
One weekday evening at Csardas, I was enjoying the du jour potato soup when the owner, Julius Jancso, looked at what I was spooning up with gusto and said, ``That's junk
And in case you're thinking this guy gets special treatment, let me assure you, we were just two people who wandered into Csardas that night.
With slightly different text, two of its three verses appear on a recent recording by the Tukros Ensemble, currently one of Budapest's leading folk revival groups ("Juhasznota, csardas es friss" on Tukros Tabor Hungarian Village Music, Folk Europa FECD 005 [2002], CD).
They apparently knew klezmer repertoire, but chose not to play it, because nobody asked to hear it, performing instead melodies from operettas, csardas, tango, waltzes and other light music.
Laura Whalen sparkled as Rosalinde, her Csardas at Prince Orlotsky's villa a highlight in spite of an ear-jarring glitch in the orchestral accompaniment on one chord.
Christiane Riel's Roselinde was dramatically stylish, her singing at its considerable best in duets and ensembles, somewhat less so in the formidable csardas, which were uneven in projection.