Cascading Style Sheets

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Cascading Style Sheets

(World-Wide Web)
(CSS) An extension to HTML to allow styles, e.g. colour, font, size to be specified for certain elements of a hypertext document. Style information can be included in-line in the HTML file or in a separate CSS file (which can then be easily shared by multiple HTML files). Multiple levels of CSS can be used to allow selective overriding of styles.

http://w3.org/Style/CSS/.

Cascading Style Sheets

A style sheet format for HTML documents endorsed by the World Wide Web Consortium. CSS1 (Version 1.0) provided hundreds of layout settings that can be applied to all the subsequent HTML pages that are downloaded. CSS2 (Version 2.0) added support for XML, oral presentations for the visually impaired, downloadable fonts and other enhancements.

Comprising some 50 modules, CSS3 (Version 3.0) added features such as vertical text, elaborate borders and backgrounds, user interaction and greater device and browser detection. For information, visit www.w3.org/Style/CSS/. See HTML, style sheet and XSL.
References in periodicals archive ?
3m; the CSS1 athletes reach on average, for the same level, the distance of 137.
4m; the athletes from CSS1 Club reach on average, for the same level, the distance of 124.
2 minutes of the statutory playing time (80 minutes); the athletes belonging to CSS1 remained in this zone on average 33.
Although the maximal speed reached by the FC Dinamo athletes is superior to that reached by the CSS1 athletes (7.
517); the athletes from CSS1 have a moderate degree of association intensity (r = 0.
Appendix C, "CSS1 proper ties," is an alphabetic list of CSS1 properties, pseudo-elements, and pseudo-classes.
Before browsers supported CSS1 and CSS2, authors and developers of HTML documents would often have to use tables, illustrations, special characters such as nonbreaking spaces, and the single-pixel trick (which Boumphrey describes) to achieve the desired placement of text and images on screen.
After reading this book, you should be able to create CSS2 and CSS1 style sheets that will tell the browsers to: