Ctenoid Scale

ctenoid scale

[′ten‚ȯid ‚skāl]
(vertebrate zoology)
A thin, acellular structure composed of bonelike material and characterized by a serrated margin; found in the skin of advanced teleosts.

Ctenoid Scale

 

a variety of bony scale in bony fishes; the posterior margin of the scale bears a comb of small teeth or spines. Ctenoid scales are typical chiefly for higher bony fishes, such as the Perciformes, but they also occur in fishes of a lower organizational level (for example, in some Clupeiformes and Gadiformes). It is supposed that the spikes on ctenoid scales improve the hydrodynamic properties of the fish’s body.

References in periodicals archive ?
Body covered with small or moderate sized ctenoid scales, those of cheeks and opercles in 2-3 rows all cycloid except for occasional ctenoid scale posteriorly; lateral line scales simple.
2) is moderately deep bodied with relatively large ctenoid scales throughout the anterior two-thirds of the body.
Bryaninops earlei differs from all congeners in having large ctenoid scales (22-25 in longitudinal series); it is similar to B.
Distichodus mossambicus is a distinctive fish, with a deep, compressed body covered with ctenoid scales that also cover the adipose fin.
Burdak (1979) discussed the dynamics of cycloid and ctenoid scales in squamations of the leaping mullet Liza (= Mugit) saliens (Risso).
Larvae of northern sculpin have 35-36 myomeres, pelvic fins with one spine and two rays, a bony preopercular shelf, four preopercular spines, 3-14 irregular postanal ventral melanophores, few, if any, melanophores ventrally on the gut, and in larger specimens, two rows of ctenoid scales directly beneath the dorsal fins extending onto the caudal peduncle.
80 mm SL in the mid-region of the flanks of the body, increasing peripherally until the body is entirely covered by ctenoid scales at 14.
Diagnosis: Minute stout-bodied eleotrids with large ctenoid scales confined to posterior three-quarters of body (commencing after end of first dorsal fin but before origin of second dorsal fin), and no cycloid scales; head and body anterior to origin of second dorsal fin scaleless.
The introduction of scanning electron microscopy allowed its use for detailed study of fish scales, such as that by Roberts (1993) on ctenoid scales of Teleostei, revealing their microstructure and variety.
In tetras, important characters such as ctenoid scales, incomplete lateral line, naked predorsal line etc.