Ctesias


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Ctesias

(tē`shēəs, tē`sēəs), fl. 400 B.C., Greek historian and physician of Cnidus. He lived many years in the Persian court. He tended Artaxerxes II when he was wounded in the battle of Cunaxa (401 B.C.). In 398 he was sent by the Persians as envoy to Evagoras and Conon. Of Ctesias' histories only Photius' abridgments of Persica and Indica remain; in them Ctesias hoped to show Herodotus' unreliability.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nearly 60 dermestid species have been found in the Himalayan Region (Hava 2009), representing 9 genera, such as Dermestes Linnaeus, Thorictodes Reitter, Attagenus Latreille, Anthrenus Geoffroy, Evorinea Beal, Orphinus Motschulsky, Ctesias Stephens, and Trogoderma Dejean.
Sources of Achaemenid stories can be found in Herodotus, Ctesias, Xenophon, and even Plutarch.
19) Se sabe que Ctesias de Cnido, un medico griego que en el siglo V a.
The Greek physician Ctesias (400 BC) espoused the magical curative powers of ground and ingested unicorn horn (Schoenberger 1951: 284).
On the one hand, these encounters with mythical men and beasts imitate the paradoxa we find in travel accounts and histories, like those of Ctesias.
51) He quotes the more ancient authority of Ctesias who
For example, Ctesias of Cnidus, a Greek physician in fifth century BC, wrote about nineteen wonders about animals and plants, another sixteen are related to streams, rivers and minerals, seven races and six climatic phenomena (see Farr).
10 Hamilton Sardanapalus was, according to the Greek writer Ctesias, the last king of Assyria.
10) A visao do Oriente, as maravilhas da India, o mare clausum (Indico), na concepcao medieval, estao baseados em fontes helenistico-latinas e nas descricoes lendarias iniciadas por Ctesias de Cnido e Megastenes no seculo IV a.
9) Democedes and Ctesias were Greek doctors who served Persian kings.
Whatever the sense of `unknown to' that is being used here, it surely applies no more before 331 BC -- with the references by Herodotus (who also gives a careful description of the hippopotamus), Ctesias and especially the detailed anatomical account of Aristotle -- than it does later.
Recent papers with the descriptions of a new species are infrequent and were provided by Mroczkowski (1959--description of Anthrenus lindbergi; 1961b--descriptions of 2 species of Ctesias spp.