Cuirass


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Cuirass

 

a defensive armor consisting of two plates curved to fit the back and chest and connected at the shoulders and on the sides by buckles.

In ancient times cuirasses were made of thick felt covered with skin or sometimes with sheet copper. In the 13th century iron cuirasses appeared. In Russia cuirasses were used from 1731 in the cuirassier regiments. From the mid-19th century until 1917 they were used only as part of the formal dress uniform of the regiments of the 1st Guards Cavalry Division.


Cuirass

 

(Russian, laty), a plate armor (combat equipment) for protection against injuries by silent weapons and later by firearms.

At first a cuirass was a thick textile or leather piece of clothing; with the appearance of metal, metal plates were attached to it. The peoples of the ancient Orient had such cuirasses before they were known in the West. Metal cuirasses were of two kinds, either made of plates or scales. With the spread of firearms (from the 14th century), the metal cuirass became a thick armor with separate parts for the protection of the body, arms, and legs.

References in periodicals archive ?
The unsurpassable Vera Sterne will no doubt be taking your cuirass off the wall this very second Blue, giving it an affectionate little polish with her blouse, slipping into her boots and spurs, unfurling her whip.
The Roman muscle cuirass he was wearing was originally designed to intimidate opponents into believing that the man behind the plate was a colossal killing machine.
a fury seized them all, A fiery family passion for the name Of Lancelot, and a glory one with theirs so they overbore Sir Lancelot and his charger, and a spear Pricked sharply his own cuirass, and the head Pierced through his side.
The former springs from the Latin coriacea, or leather, the cuirass designating the breastplate worn by cavalrymen, whereas the latter, ultimately from the Latin videre (to see), designates a mounted sentinel posted at the head of an advancing army.
The armor itself was an artistic prop; during the civil wars, only a cuirass, with detachable breast and back plates, was normally worn with a buff-coat and light helmet.
THE HISTORY OF MECHANICAL VENTILATORS II-42 Evolution of Mechanical Ventilators: A Historical Fact File II-42 The Development of Tank Respirator and the Cuirass Ventilator II-42 Tank Respirator II-43 Cuirass Ventilator II-43 Conventional Mechanical Ventilation II-43 7.
10) It was unavailable for inspection (its present location is unknown) but from its photograph it appears to be a modern copy of the ancient type combined with a cuirass bust whose iconography is not attested in Roman art.
There were a clay surrounded wooden coffin (nendokaku), wood coffin, horse gear, a sword handle made of deer antler, iron arrowheads, cuirass and belt fittings.
Only 11 patients achieved 24-hour independence from invasive positive pressure ventilation (in some cases short-lived), and 7 of these patients still required non-invasive ventilatory support (3 rocking bed, 2 BiPAP, 1 Cuirass ventilator, 1 oxygen via tracheostomy).
The Unity of the State, a fresco by Rosso in the Grande Galerie at Fontainebleau, presented Francois crowned with laurel, the Gorgoneion on his cuirass, and lion masks atop his boots.
For the museum, a critical element of the armour was the high-quality and distinctive nature of its etched decoration; Mr Eaves states that the etching of the cuirass 'can be counted among the best decorated pieces of that group [the early Brunswick armour]: a work of art of exceptional quality'.
0 mm ID uncuffed tube to intubate trachea of a patient with severe tracheal stenosis but the ventilation through this tube was found to be difficult and inadequate, for which Hayek's oscillator cuirass ventilator had to be used to maintain sufficient ventilation.