Culdees


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Culdees: Céli Dé

Culdees

(kəldēz`) [Irish,=servants of God], ancient monks of Ireland and Scotland, appearing after the 8th cent. Little is known of their origin, and their relationship to the monks of the Celtic Church, e.g., at Iona, is unclear. They were originally anchorites, but by the time of the reforms of St. Malachy (12th cent.) they had become secular canons living in community. They gained a reputation for extreme laxness. The last Culdee community, at Armagh, was disbanded in 1541.
References in periodicals archive ?
Knox's rejection of Rome represented a return to the native tradition of Presbyterianism traced back to the fifth-century Culdees, a tradition subverted by foreign 'Romanism' which undermined and destroyed nationality by subsuming it into the greater will of the Papacy.
In the address that preceded Dove's at the Glasgow commemoration, William Maxwell Hetherington not only credited Wallace with having contributed to the achievement of Scottish national liberty, but argued that Wallace was himself a Culdee, opposed to Roman influence in the purer Christianity of Scotland.
It would speak at greater length of the cultores Dei or Culdees, early medieval Irish monks recognized as bringing learning to many parts of Britain and the Continent.
Brendan Church of the Culdees - The church at 120 Fifth St.
The hagiographical texts deal with the tenth--century Irish reforming monks, the Culdees, and the Vision of Adomnan is the most important Irish apocalyptic work.
Brendan Church of the Culdees - The 19th anniversary of the consecration of Abbot-Bishop Ivan MacKillop and to the Episcopate will be celebrated at 11 a.