honour

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honour

(US), honor
1. 
a. Bridge Poker any of the top five cards in a suit or any of the four aces at no trumps
b. Whist any of the top four cards
2. Golf the right to tee off first

Honour

a. a title used to or of certain judges
b. (in Ireland) a form of address in general use
References in periodicals archive ?
The culture of honor differs from other cultures in that violence will be used to attain and protect this kind of honor.
The popular culture's view played an important role in the culture of honor.
history fostered a culture of honor, argue Cohen and Nisbett.
If there is, indeed, a culture of honor in the South that lends itself to violence, where did it come from?
We are focused on sustainability, we support philanthropic and community initiatives, we value diversity and inclusion in our thinking and our workforce, and we have a strong culture of honor and integrity.
The politics of individual expediency and ambition, which come to replace the old chivalric code of the common good, serve to highlight the simultaneous shift from a culture of honor to a culture of competition.
An overabundance of young men, a culture of honor and the absence of other means of achieving status have been among the factors demonstrated to influence violence in a society.
James found the events surrounding the Rising of the Northern Earls in 1569 steeped in the culture of honor.
48) The Irish tracts, in other words, do not just concern Ireland but implicitly offer a drastic critique of the whole aristocratic culture of honor.
Indeed, for many of us, the culture of honors gives meaning to our role as educators; we identify strongly with the honors communities on our campuses.
In a program such as ours, with faculty coming from a number of disciplinary homes and schools of thought, we wanted to know how the culture of honors is cultivated in practice.
Finally, the culture of honors programs can impede the helping project if its ethos celebrates competition and individual academic achievement excessively.