Cumacea

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Cumacea

[kyü′mās·ē·ə]
(invertebrate zoology)
An order of the class Crustacea characterized by a well-developed carapace which is fused dorsally with at least the first three thoracic somites and overhangs the sides.

Cumacea

 

an order of invertebrates of the subclass of higher crustaceans. The body measures 1–18 mm long (only a few species reaching 35 mm). There are two divisions, the cephalothorax and the narrow abdomen. The cephalothoracic carapace covers the three front thoracic somites and is fused with them. There is a single eye. Of the three pairs of maxillipeds, the first bears complexly constructed gills. In the female, the second and third pairs of maxillipeds have plates that form the brood pouch. The five free thoracic somites each have a pair of two-jointed limbs. Abdominal appendages are found only on the male. There are about 600 species, living primarily in the seas. They serve as food for fish. Members of this order have been acclimatized to some reservoirs (for example, Pseudocuma cercaroides is found in the Dnieper Reservoir).

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Although some prey items, including mysids, gammaridean amphipods, and cumaceans, were consumed regularly, most prey types were infrequently observed in the stomachs of southern kingfish (Fig.
Ostracods, copepods, and cumaceans were found within stomachs from L.
nondecapod crustaceans (including amphipods, isopods, cumaceans, mysids, and mantis shrimp), bivalves (clams and periwinkles), fishes (44 species identified), worms and wormlike organisms (nematodes, polychaetes, annelids, and leeches), and other unidentified (UID) items (inorganic matter, organic matter, eggs, and insects).
Besides the prey groups mentioned for kelp bass, the diet of barred sand bass were sipunculids, cumaceans, and echinoderms.
The benthic prey comprised a variety of fishes and crustaceans including amphipods, cumaceans, mysids, shrimps, nematodes, nemerteans, and polychaetes (Table 4).
Cumaceans were clearly dominant in juvenile salmon in San Pablo Bay (km 26), but insects were still important.
There was greater diversity in feeding in the upper bays-Suisun and San Pablo-where insects, copepods, mysids, and cumaceans formed a major portion of young chinook salmon diet.
By winter, large copepods virtually disappeared from diets in some areas (Sobolevskii and Senchenko, 1996); chaetognaths and epibenthic prey such as mysids, shrimps, caprellid amphipods, and cumaceans were incorporated in the diet as vertical distributions of the fish changed and pelagic prey became scarce[12] (Merati and Brodeur, 1996; Sobolevskii and Senchenko, 1996; Brodeur et al.