Cumaean


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Cumaean

sibyl to discover future, leads Aeneas to Hades. [Gk. Lit.: Aeneid]
References in periodicals archive ?
The depiction of the Cumaean Sybil under the spell of Apollo in The Aeneid illustrates this reading of female inspiration as submission to a dominating--and violently male-- divinity: "But the Sibyl, still not broken in by Apollo, storms / with a wild fury through her cave.
Note here the parallels with Virgil's Cumaean Sibyl whose "bosom heaves, and she is taller to behold .
Eternal life must be combined with eternal youth lest we confront the fate of the Cumaean Sybil, shriveled and shrunken but still alive.
She has a message for the reader and speaks to him or her: "For on one occasion I myself saw, with my own eyes, the Cumaean Sibyl hanging in a cage, and when some boys said to her, 'Sibyl, what do you want?
Apollo and the Cumaean Sybil (Wallace Collection) is bound by the terms of its bequest not to be lent from Hertford House, but the pictures from the Musee Conde in Chantilly and the Glasgow Art Gallery are not restricted in the same way.
Especially in light of Bloom's provocative reading of the syllable as a cry of pain, I find it surprising that Le Guin and Lavinia never invoke the myths attached to the Cumaean Sibyl, Aeneas's Sibyl, who similarly becomes a voice that endures even after the body passes, and famously reveals her death wish in T.
The latter has been too doubtfully read as an ironic allusion to another Virgilian pretext, Eclogues 4:4-10--presumably especially "iam nova progenies caelo demittitur alto" (7)--but after the prior reference to the Cumaean Sybil Marvell does not pursue that possibility.
In such a moment, truly Cumaean powers descend upon Delilah" (256).
This Phoenician, who drowns in Dante's whirlpool, is Eliot's Ulysses; the withered Cumaean Sybil quoted in Greek for the poem's epigraph--"I want to die"--is his Tithonus.
It is, in fact, the Cumaean Sybil who utters that prophecy in Book VI of the Aeneid, and although she is foreseeing the troubles that come from immigration, it is to the troubles suffered by an immigrant that she refers.
He begins with a Latin edition of the book faced with English translation, and appends a discussion of Virgil's sources for the Cumaean Sibyl.