Cumaean sibyl


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Cumaean sibyl

was granted long life by Apollo; when she rejected his love, he withheld eternal youth and she withered away. [Gk. Myth.: Metamorphoses, 14]

Cumaean sibyl

famous prophetess; leads Aeneas through underworld. [Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
See: Guide
References in periodicals archive ?
She has a message for the reader and speaks to him or her: "For on one occasion I myself saw, with my own eyes, the Cumaean Sibyl hanging in a cage, and when some boys said to her, 'Sibyl, what do you want?
His main source is the prophecy of the Cumaean Sibyl in the Aeneid, and his later translation of that passage makes the imagery of violent sex, which is relatively latent in the Latin, obvious and explicit.
He begins with a Latin edition of the book faced with English translation, and appends a discussion of Virgil's sources for the Cumaean Sibyl.
One recalls the vast cavern of the Cumaean sibyl in book VI of Virgil's Aeneid (vv.
Sir Robert kept Claude Lorrain's landscape, A Prospect of Baiae with Apollo and the Cumaean Sibyl close to him whilst he was in Downing Street as the King's first minister.
Its echoes of classical antiquity, which resonated in Claude's imagination, reminded Claude that its maritime ruins, from promontory to promontory, were the legendary domain of a prophetess, the Cumaean Sibyl.
Higgins says that "Spelt from Sibyl's Leaves"--by having been located, through the allusion to the Cumaean Sibyl, "discursively in the realm of Virgil"--"refuses the consolation of a Christian context" (p.
While Katherine goes by herself to visit different sites such as the Archeological Museum, the cave of the Cumaean Sibyl, the Catacombs, and the sulfur breaks, Alexander goes to Naples and attempts, unsuccessfully, to have an affair.
The orphic element of classical times, hidden under a peaceful appearance, is reiterated in Katherine's later visit to the Cumaean Sibyl, where the theme of love is interlaced with that of eros and rape.
Reading Genesis, we experience the same thrill of recognition when we see Vergil's Cumaean Sibyl in Turner's prophet Hermione; when we catch glimpses of Dante's Beatrice in Turner's; when Hesiod's Gala (Earth) reappears as Gaea Van Riebeck; even when we discover that the Finnish epic Kalevala has loaned its name to a spaceship.