cumin

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Related to Cuminum cyminum: Glycyrrhiza glabra, Trachyspermum ammi

cumin

or

cummin

(both: kŭm`ĭn), low annual herb (Cuminum cyminum) of the family Umbelliferae (parsleyparsley,
Mediterranean aromatic herb (Petroselinum crispum or Apium petroselinum) of the carrot family, cultivated since the days of the Romans for its foliage, used in cookery as a seasoning and garnish.
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 family), long cultivated in the Old World for the aromatic seedlike fruits. The fruits resemble the related caraway and are similarly used in cooking. Cumin is an ingredient of curry powder; the oil is used for liqueurs and in veterinary practice and was formerly used in medicine. Cumin is mentioned in the Bible. For black cumin, see love-in-a-mistlove-in-a-mist,
hardy annual garden plant (Nigella damascena) of the family Ranunculaceae (buttercup family), having finely cut foliage and blue or white flowers surrounded by a cluster of thready bracts.
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. Cumin is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Umbellales, family Umbelliferae.

cumin

[′kyü·mən]
(botany)
Cuminum cyminum An annual herb in the family Umbelliferae; the fruit is valuable for its edible, aromatic seeds.

cumin

, cummin
an umbelliferous Mediterranean plant, Cuminum cyminum, with finely divided leaves and small white or pink flowers
References in periodicals archive ?
Seeds of Cuminum cyminum had the thickness crust resulted delay in water absorption and then this plant in studied plants had the least germination speed.
and Anethum graveolens (up to 100mM/lit), Cuminum cyminum, Trachyspermum ammi, Melilotus officinalis, and Origanum majoran (up to 200mM/lit), Lactuca sativa and Sesamum indicum (up to 250mM/lit) Alyssum spp, Portulaca oleracea and Trigonella foenum (up to 450mM/lit).
Among the medicinal plant receptors, root elongation of Cuminum cyminum was less sensitive to the exposure of different concentrated extracts.
Maximum relative root growth (RER) was found in Cuminum cyminum (118%) at leaf concentration of 10 g [L.
The extracts inhibited stem length of Plantago psyllium, Plantago ovata and Ocimum basilicum seedling but the same extracts generally stimulated stem growth of Foeniculum vulgare, Nigella sativa and Cuminum cyminum seedlings at low concentrations.
Maximum (136%) relative shoot growth (RES) was observed in Cuminum cyminum at leaf concentration of 50 g [L.
The leaf and root extracts from Sorghum halepens reduced the dry weight of seedling in Plantago psyllium, Plantago ovata, Foeniculum vulgare, Ocimum basilicum, and Nigella sativa significantly while increasing the dry weight of Cuminum cyminum at low concentrations.
The oil of Cuminum cyminum strongly inhibited the growth of A.
Results of GC-MS analyses of Hyssopus officinalis, Cuminum cyminum,Thymus vulgaris and cones of Cupressus arizonica in tables 3-6 indicates there are many different components in all essential oils.
The essential oil from Hyssopus officinalis differed markedly from distillated, Thymus vulgaris, Cuminum cyminum and cones of Cupressus arizonica.
Particularly, Hyssopus officinalis, Cuminum cyminum, Thymus vulgaris and cones of Cupressus arizonica essential oils possess strong anti-Aspergillus activity inhibiting the growth.