cumulus cloud

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cumulus cloud

[′kyü·myə·ləs ‚klau̇d]
(meteorology)
A principal type of cloud in the form of individual, detached elements which are generally dense and possess sharp nonfibrous outlines; these elements develop vertically, appearing as rising mounds, domes, or towers, the upper parts of which often resemble a cauliflower.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's got to have something to do with the clouds," he said Thursday morning, as puffy cumulus clouds started forming in an increasing westerly wind; a day you might say would be perfect for making a trip from west to east.
That could even be a head, jutting out from the bottom of the 20-million-year-old fossil, at least in the sense that cumulus clouds sometimes resemble dragons.
The cumulus clouds over the buildings are starting to flatten out.
Hilltop-perched on a late spring morning recently, I observed argosies of cumulus clouds cruise like stately shadowed castles across an azure sky.
According to the team, the white spot is the tip of the iceberg for the storm, like the cumulus clouds on top of thunderstorms on Earth.
China is one of the world's leading users of rain-making technology, which involves seeding cumulus clouds with dry ice or silver iodide to prompt precipitation.
After you descend into an amphitheater thick with ``hoodoos'' - as the multicolored rock formations have come to be called - your imagination is likely to take flight, much as it does when you gaze at elaborate white puffs of cumulus clouds.
I think you are talking about the puffy cumulus clouds, which have interesting shapes above and are flat on the bottom.
A few cumulus clouds and a turquoise sky complete the autumn palette.
For every 1[degrees]C rise in ocean temperature beneath a cloudy region, the ratio of high-flying cirrus clouds to lower, rain-generating cumulus clouds dropped by about 22 percent, report Lindzen and his colleagues in the March BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY.
As a self-described adventurer in the "world of the nonexistent"--that is, of the image--Muniz has deployed these unlikely media to conjure everything from Andy Warhol paintings to simulated cumulus clouds, from Hollywood film stills to newspaper clippings.
Kan-nana and Kan-pachi clouds are pollution-filled cumulus clouds that form above Tokyo's Kan-nana and Kan-pachi highways.