Cunaxa


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Cunaxa

(kyo͞onăk`sə), ancient town of Babylonia, near the Euphrates River, NE of Ctesiphon. It was the scene of a battle (401 B.C.) between Cyrus the YoungerCyrus the Younger,
d. 401 B.C., Persian prince, younger son of Darius II and Parysatis. He was his mother's favorite, and she managed to get several satrapies in Asia Minor for him when he was very young.
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 and Artaxerxes IIArtaxerxes II,
d. 358 B.C., king of ancient Persia (404–358 B.C.), son and successor of Darius II. He is sometimes called in Greek Artaxerxes Mnemon [the thoughtful]. Early in his reign Cyrus the Younger attempted to assassinate him and seize the throne.
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, described by XenophonXenophon
, c.430 B.C.–c.355 B.C., Greek historian, b. Athens. He was one of the well-to-do young disciples of Socrates before leaving Athens to join the Greek force (the Ten Thousand) that was in the service of Cyrus the Younger of Persia.
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 in the Anabasis. ClearchusClearchus
, d. 401 B.C., Spartan officer, celebrated as the leader of the Ten Thousand. Sent in 410 to govern Byzantium, he made himself unpopular by his harsh discipline, and Alcibiades took the city in 408 B.C.
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, Spartan mercenary leader under Cyrus, chose to attack the Persian left wing (under Tissaphernes), which he completely routed and pursued. When he and his Ten Thousand returned, they found that Cyrus had fought hard in the center, had broken Artaxerxes' bodyguard, but in the moment of victory had been killed. Cyrus' army, demoralized, had broken up, and the Persians had taken the field. The retreat of the Ten Thousand northward is the most famous feature of the campaign.

Cunaxa

the site near the lower Euphrates where Artaxerxes II defeated Cyrus the Younger in 401 bc
References in periodicals archive ?
There is, of course, the simple fact that despite their victory the lovers and the other Greeks are still trapped behind enemy lines in Persian territory because of the death of the leader of the rebellion, which could hardly fail to recall the situation of the Ten Thousand after Cunaxa.
Although he employed the optimistic title Anabasis (the first-leg "march up" into the interior of Iraq), in fact, Xenophon's account really gets going only after the Greeks were dry-gulched at Cunaxa.
After the Battle of Cunaxa where Cyrus was killed, the Greek army was demoralized and discouraged as they saw no way of marching 1,000 miles back to Greece with 10,000 soldiers through unfriendly country, not to mention that they currently faced a numerically superior army.
Martin Fetherston-Godley has successfully appealed to the Jockey Club against the demotion of first past the post Xenophon of Cunaxa on May 19 at Newbury.
Zygo (100-30) was promoted to first after losing out in a photo to Xenophon of Cunaxa (with a name like that it deserved to be disqualified).