curfew

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Related to Curfews: Juvenile Curfews

curfew

[O.Fr.,=cover fire], originally a signal, such as the ringing of a bell, to damp the fire, extinguish all lights in the dwelling, and retire for the night. The custom originated as a precaution against fires and was common throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. The curfew has most recently been used in times of turbulence, such as revolution or civil disorders. It is a restrictive measure forcing all persons into their homes to reduce activity against the government or the occupying force. In some communities it has been applied to curb juvenile delinquency.

Curfew

 

an emergency measure prohibiting residents of a community to be on the streets during specified times without special permission.

In the USSR a curfew can be established only under martial law. Its purpose is to maintain order and to prevent diversionary, espionage, or other enemy activity against troops, military and civilian bodies of authority, and military and industrial objectives. Special military subunits are assigned to maintain order during a curfew. In capitalist countries a curfew is established by military and civilian authorities not only in wartime but also in peacetime in cases of increased political and economic aggravations in the country and is often accompanied by arbitrary and lawless police action.

curfew

1. an official regulation setting restrictions on movement, esp after a specific time at night
2. in medieval Europe
a. the ringing of a bell to prompt people to extinguish fires and lights
b. the time at which the curfew bell was rung
c. the bell itself
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the proposed 'Unsafe Hours for Children Act,' the curfew would be in effect during 'unsafe hours' and in 'public places' from 10 p.
Dubai: Filipino residents in Dubai welcomed the stricter enforcement of curfew laws where unaccompanied minors are being taken off the streets of Metro Manila but decried the way authorities are implementing it.
The curfews in six neighborhoods -- CevatpaE-a, FatihpaE-a, Dabanoy-lu, Hasyrly, Cemal Yylmaz and SavaE- -- have been in place for almost two months.
Iraq's Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi ordered the curfew suspension in Baghdad last Saturday and the decision was described as a double-edged sword by citizens.
The authorities have presented no evidence that curfews for Syrian refugees are necessary for public order or security in Lebanon," said Nadim Houry, deputy Middle East director at HRW, noting that his organization had identified at least 45 municipalities that had imposed curfews over the past year.
Curfew is a topic that comes up in my fair-housing classes when I am speaking to the issue of reasonable versus unreasonable rules for children at apartment communities.
John Black, who is in breach of a community order and conditional discharge, was given a sixmonth order with a 12-week curfew.
The curfew would mostly hinder cargo planes that fly in and out of the airport, but also would eliminate nighttime noise and allow Bob Hope Airport to save $67million in operation and residential noise insulation costs through 2015, said spokesman Victor Gill.
Though daytime curfews seem to be less attractive, more than three in four cities found afterschool programs to be effective in helping to cut down on juvenile offenses during the daytime hours.
Curfew orders, usually with electronic tags, were introduced by ex-Home Secretary David Blunkett.
A welsh council votes this week on a proposed children's curfew to curb unruly behaviour, vandalism and noise.
Many public curfews are set at hours when kids should be at home anyway.