curare

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Related to Curino: Currarino triad

curare

(kyo͝orär`ē), any of a variety of substances originally used as arrow poisons by Native South Americans in hunting and in warfare. The main active substance of curare, tubocurarine, is an alkaloid extracted from Chondodendron tomentosum, Strychnos toxifera, and other plant species. The poison produces muscle paralysis by interfering with the transmission of nerve impulses at the receptor sites of all skeletal muscle. Muscles with many nerves, such as eye muscles, are affected first. In recent years curare has been put to medical use. When given in small quantities with general anesthesiaanesthesia
[Gr.,=insensibility], loss of sensation, especially that of pain, induced by drugs, especially as a means of facilitating safe surgical procedures. Early modern medical anesthesia dates to experiments with nitrous oxide (laughing gas) by Sir Humphry Davy of England
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, especially in abdominal surgery, curare ensures the desired relaxation of muscle tissue with a minimal concentration of the anesthetic, lessening the possibilities of anesthesia-induced complications. Curare is also used to relieve spastic paralysis, to treat some mental disorders, and to induce muscle relaxation for the setting of fractures.

Curare

 

(from Carib kurari), a mixture of condensed extracts from plants of the genera Strychnos, Chondodendron, and other South American groups.

Upon entering the blood, curare blocks the transmission of neural impulses from the motor nerves to the skeletal musculature, causing muscular relaxation. Curare was used for centuries by natives of South America as an arrow poison. It contains a large number of alkaloids of the curarine group. Curariform agents are used for therapeutic purposes.

curare

[kyü′rä·rē]
(organic chemistry)
Poisonous extract from the plant Strychnos toxifera containing a mixture of alkaloids that produce paralysis of the voluntary muscles by acting on synaptic junctions; used as an adjunct to anesthesia in surgery.

curare

, curari
1. black resin obtained from certain tropical South American trees, esp Chondrodendron tomentosum, acting on the motor nerves to cause muscular paralysis: used medicinally as a muscle relaxant and by South American Indians as an arrow poison
2. any of various trees of the genera Chondrodendron (family Menispermaceae) and Strychnos (family Loganiaceae) from which this resin is obtained
References in periodicals archive ?
Stemming from and responding to various social and political controversies that characterized the 1970s, its founders, including Curino, challenged hegemonic notions of national memory by discovering and performing stories that focus on the lives of ordinary people.
Alone on the stage, embodying Elvira and Luisa, Curino focuses the spectator's attention more poignantly on their role as signifiers for every woman alone at home, while the empty stage around Curino gives symbolic meaning to the solitude and alienation that accompanies domestic labor.
If the first play emphasizes solitude in the singularity of Curino on stage, the sequel underscores the distance between male and female work through the interactions among the three actors, who orbit around each other, come together, and eventually split apart.
Moreover, given her geographical proximity to Torino, a city with a long history of labor strife, it is not surprising that Curino would put the issues of labor relations and gender discrimination in dialogue with each other.
This is exactly the kind of relationships between labor and production that Curino illustrates through the characters of Sacerdoti and Revel, to which I will now turn.
The value of women's work is at its clearest in the reproduction of the labor force through the female body; to no surprise, Curino elaborates on Sacerdoti's choices for Camillo's education, frequently mentions all six of Revel and Camillo's children, and even devotes a full scene to the birth of Adriano in the second play.