curlew

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Related to Curlews: stone curlew, Eurasian Curlew

curlew

(kûr`lo͞o), common name for large shore birds of both hemispheres, generally brown and buff in color and with decurved bills. There are eight species, belonging to the genus Numenius. The long-billed curlew, N. americanus, its bill almost one third the body length (about 2 ft/61 cm), is now rare in the E United States; it frequents salt marshes, prairies, and tidal creeks in the West. In summer it eats locusts and other injurious insects. The Hudsonian and the nearly extinct Eskimo curlews migrate from arctic breeding grounds to South America. The bristle-thighed curlew summers and nests in Alaska and winters on South Pacific islands, where it feeds on the eggs of other birds. The curlew makes a nonstop flight between breeding grounds. Some of the godwits and ibises are called curlews. Curlews are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Charadriiformes, family Scolopacidae.

curlew

any large shore bird of the genus Numenius, such as N. arquata of Europe and Asia: family Scolopacidae (sandpipers, etc.), order Charadriiformes. They have a long downward-curving bill and occur in northern and arctic regions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The curlew is a magnificent bird with a distinctive downcurved beak and unusually long legs.
5) He goes on to mention the fact that plovers were sometimes said to feed upon air, but he fails to develop any convincing link between plovers and curlews.
Excessive catching of migrating birds, particularly stone curlew which is exposed to extinction, has a serious impact on the wild life, and introduces changes to birds' regular actions," Al Suwaidi said.
The much-loved curlew was once instantly recognisable in Wales by its distinctive call and long, curved beak.
SAVING the endangered curlew is the key priority for the RSPB as it celebrates its 100th year looking after birdlife in Wales.
The activity of the curlew is dependent upon weather and exact times will be confirmed when booking.
Northumberland National Park was revealed as a champion of the curlew today amid reports the bird is at risk worldwide.
The Peak Birds Project was set up in 2001 to halt the decline of three bird species: lapwings, curlews and twites in the Peak District.
However, those that have declined most since 1994, such as curlew (49%), swift (50%) and starling (63%) showed much smaller increases on the previous year, so there is a long way to go to return these birds to their historic levels.
Often seen around the Dee estuary, searching for invertebrates with its distinctive long curved-down bill, the curlew is one of Merseyside's most familiar wading birds.
Results from the latest Breeding Bird Survey (BBS), revealed today show a 38% drop in the North East curlew population between 1995 and 2008.
In contrast, the curlew increased in 108% of South Pennine sites, with whinchats increasing in 136%.