Curtis, Charles

Curtis, Charles,

1860–1936, Vice President of the United States (1929–33), b. near North Topeka, Kans. Of part Native American background, Curtis lived for three years on a Kaw reservation. After studying law with a Topeka attorney, he was admitted to the bar (1881) and entered Republican politics in Kansas. He served in the U.S. Congress (1892–1906), where he championed Native American rights to self-government with the Curtis Act (1898). He served in the U.S. Senate from 1907 to 1913 and from 1915 to 1929. He was a fiscal conservative and generally supported farm and veterans' benefits. After an unsuccessful bid for the Republican presidential nomination, he became Herbert Hoover's running mate in 1928. Once elected, he played little part in the administration, but in 1932 he again ran with Hoover in his unsuccessful try for a second term.


See biography by M. Ewy (1961).

Curtis, Charles

(1860–1936) vice-president, U.S. representative; born in North Topeka, Kans. He claimed to be one-eighth American Indian and made much of this in his political career. He became Herbert Hoover's vice-president after 34 years in Congress. He supported the Republican policies even as the impact of the Great Depression became more evident.
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The film, starring Kirk Douglas, Lawrence Olivier, Tony Curtis, Charles Laughton, Jean Simmons and Peter Ustinov, tells the story of the slave Spartacus (Douglas) who leads a freedom revolt against the Roman Empire around 71 B.
Co-starring Sir Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Tony Curtis, Charles Laughton, Peter Ustinov, John Gavin and Woody Strode.
It features a magnificent score, staggering battle scenes and tremendous performances by such Hollywood heavyweights as Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Tony Curtis, Charles Laughton, Peter Ustinov (Oscar for Best Supporting Actor), John Gavin, Nina Foch, Herbert Lom, John Ireland, Charles McGraw, Woody Strode and Joanna Barnes.