Cushitic


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Cushitic

(kəshĭt`ĭk), group of languages belonging to the Afroasiatic family of languages. See Afroasiatic languagesAfroasiatic languages
, formerly Hamito-Semitic languages
, family of languages spoken by more than 250 million people in N Africa; much of the Sahara; parts of E, central, and W Africa; and W Asia (especially the Arabian peninsula, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bedauye (Beja) hay- is used for 'to say', Low East Cushitic *hay- is used for 'to say', and High East Cushitic *hay- and*hiy- is used for 'to say', and Dahalo (Sanye) hwayu is used for 'voice', 'sound', and 'noise'.
Therefore, for Antenor Firmin, lawyer, anthropologist, and enthusiastic Egyptologist, the ancient Egyptian language belongs to the Cushitic, Nilotic, and Chadic linguistic groups, as he asserts in 1885.
For Chadic, see al-Hassan 1998; Newman 1986, 1990; for Cushitic, see Zaborski 1986; for Egyptian, see Gardiner 1957(3): [section][section]274, 425-26: Edel 1955: [section][section]429-39, 558b; Reintges 2003.
His linguistic range was extraordinary, including two of the Semitic languages of Ethiopia (Amharic and Tigrinya), a Cushitic language (Oromo), Maasai, which is often classified as Nilo-Hamitic, and several Bantu languages.
The Cushitic populations of the Somali Coast in the Horn of Africa have an ancient history.
By Abas Eenow April 13, 2009 -- A long time ago, most of the current Somali territories in the horn of Africa belonged to the larger Cushitic nationality of Oromo known by the Somalis as Galla and others.
in Tuki (Biloa 1995) and Duala (Epee 1976), both Bantu, but also in Cushitic (cf.
Dr BLENCH reassesses the derivations of the African languages, proposing a scheme of three phyla, including the Chadic languages as a branch separated from the Cushitic through migration with herds.
These so-called eastern Cushitic speakers were historically, geographically, culturally and linguistically connected peoples.
In terms of the overall families, the number of Cushitic and Chadic languages has increased, while the number of Iranian and Turkic languages has decreased.
We then exemplify our claim by a comparative analysis in some detail of incorporation-like phenomena in two unrelated languages: object-verb constructions in Iraqw, a Cushitic language spoken in Tanzania, and so-called "separable noun-verb compounds" in Modern Standard Dutch.
Another asserts they originated from pastoral communities ethnically affiliated to Cushitic speakers in the Lama archipelago and only invited the Bantu farming and iron-using communities to settle in their towns as collaborators (Allen 1983).