cutoff frequency

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cutoff frequency

[′kət‚ȯf ‚frē·kwən·sē]
(electronics)
A frequency at which the attenuation of a device begins to increase sharply, such as the limiting frequency below which a traveling wave in a given mode cannot be maintained in a waveguide, or the frequency above which an electron tube loses efficiency rapidly. Also known as critical frequency; cutoff.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1994, the company was the first to commercialize the SIEGET(R) 25 family of ultra-high-frequency transistors with a cut-off frequency (fT) of 25 GHz.
The optimized process features an NPN bipolar device with a cut-off frequency of 25 GHz, and a maximum frequency of 40 GHz.
35-micron lithography and has a 45GHz cut-off frequency (fT), but an enhanced 0.
A software command configures the chip for either the default on-chip 15kHz cut-off limit or for an external capacitor-set cut-off frequency limit.
A RF transistor with cut-off frequency beyond 300 Ghz is also reported.
If the H (s) has been directly transferred to the needed simulative low pass, high pass, band pass and band stop filter, then the [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] of low pass filtering is the needed low pass filter's cut-off frequency.
The signal of the cutting force, the acceleration and the sound, are amplified and low-pass filtered with the cut-off frequency of 50 kHz whereas the acoustic emission signal is amplified and low-pass filtered at 1 MHz prior to digitization and Fast Fourier Transform calculation within PC as shown in Fig.
5 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- In a just-published paper in the magazine Science, IBM (NYSE: IBM) researchers demonstrated a radio-frequency graphene transistor with the highest cut-off frequency achieved so far for any graphene device - 100 billion cycles/second (100 GigaHertz).
The ATA6870/71 chipset requires less external components than comparable solutions because it includes a hot plug-in capability, six integrated AD converters with a cut-off frequency lower than 30 Hz, saving external filters, and a stackable microcontroller power supply.