cut

(redirected from Cuts Both Ways)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

cut

1. Botany incised or divided
2. Veterinary science gelded or castrated
3. Economics a decrease in government finance in a particular department or area, usually leading to a reduction of services, staff numbers, etc.
4. short for power cut
5. Chiefly US and Canadian a quantity of timber cut during a specific time or operation
6. Sport the spin of a cut ball
7. Cricket a stroke made with the bat in a roughly horizontal position
8. Films an immediate transition from one shot to the next, brought about by splicing the two shots together
9. Chem a fraction obtained in distillation, as in oil refining
10. the metal removed in a single pass of a machine tool
11. 
a. the shape of the teeth of a file
b. their coarseness or fineness
12. Brit a stretch of water, esp a canal
13. make the cut Golf to better or equal the required score after two rounds in a strokeplay tournament, thus avoiding elimination from the final two rounds
14. miss the cut Golf to achieve a greater score after the first two rounds of a strokeplay tournament than that required to play in the remaining two rounds

Cut

 

a relief printing plate used for reproducing illustrations. Depending on the type of original being reproduced, either a linecut or halftone is made. Linecuts are made from an original consisting of lines, strokes, and solid backgrounds of uniform density (pen-and-ink drawings, engraved prints, sketches); halftones are made from an image with varying densities (photographs, watercolors, or oil paintings).

Cuts are made with wood, linoleum, zinc, brass, copper, or plastic. In making zinc cuts, which are the most widely used, the original is first photographed; using photomechanical methods, it is then transferred onto a zinc plate with a light-sensitive coating, after which the areas between the surfaces to be printed are deepened by chemical or electrochemical etching. Copper cuts are made by hand engraving or etching in a solution of ferric chloride. There is also a quick method, known as single-process etching, for making magnesium and zinc cuts with etching machines. Cuts are also made on electroengraving machines. One cut will print 40,000–50,000 copies.

REFERENCES

Geodakov, A. I. Tsinkografiia. Moscow, 1962.
Geodakov, A. I. Proizvodstvo klishe. Moscow, 1972.

cut

[kət]
(biochemistry)
A double-strand incision in a duplex deoxyribonucleic acid molecule.
(chemical engineering)
A fraction obtained by a separation process.
(crystallography)
A section of a crystal having two parallel major surfaces; cuts are specified by their orientation with respect to the axes of the natural crystal, such as X cut, Y cut, BT cut, and AT cut.
(graphic arts)
A photoengraving used in letterpress printing.
(lapidary)
The style in which a gem is cut, such as brilliant cut, single cut, or rose cut.
(mathematics)
A subset of a given set whose removal from the original set leaves a set that is not connected.
(metallurgy)
(mining engineering)
To intersect a vein or a working.
To excavate coal.
To shear one side of an entry or a crosscut by digging out the coal from floor to roof with a pick.
(cell and molecular biology)
A double-strand incision in a duplex deoxyribonucleic acid molecule.
(nucleonics)
The fraction that is removed as product or advanced to the next separative element in an isotope separation process.
(textiles)
The number of needles per inch in the cylinder or needle bed in a knitting frame.

cut

1. Excavated material.
2. The void resulting from the excavation of material.
3. The depth to which material is to be excavated to bring the surface to a predetermined grade.
4. In the theater, a long slot across the stage floor for the introduction or removal of scenery.

cut

i. To switch off an aircraft engine.
ii. To cut the gun. To close the throttle of an engine.
iii. In air navigation, the intersection of two lines of position; this is the smaller angle between these two lines.

CUT

cut

(1) Remove. Delete. See cut and paste.

(2) In a video or movie, a sharp transition from one scene to another.

(3) A Unix command that extracts data from a file based on its location within the file.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 /PRNewswire/ -- "The Blind Truth," will host two special guests this evening -- Senator Norman Coleman (R-MN), Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee/Western Hemisphere Subcommittee, and Professor Alan Dershowitz, who will discuss his latest book, "Preemption: A Knife that Cuts Both Ways.
In 1990, Gloria released her bestselling solo album, Cuts Both Ways.
But that cuts both ways and brings with it some responsibilities.
Different indeed is the kind of audience called into being in their presence, but perhaps unfortunately, difference cuts both ways.
We believe the added value cuts both ways, with the customer benefiting from the depth of expertise that comes from being a fully integrated energy company, and from the convenience of having one entity coordinate the complex functions of energy supply and control.
The BNP claims the leaflet, entitled "Racism Cuts Both Ways - The Scandal of Our Age", only highlights the issue of racism against white people.
A breezy comedy about borderline psychosis, the film's title cuts both ways.
The booklet Racism Cuts Both Ways has been dropping through letterboxes this month and has gone to MPs, councillors, colleges and church groups.
Yet it cuts both ways - with chief police officers apparently now unable to stand up to the Home Office either.
A: Reasonable judgment cuts both ways, and before you question his judgment, you should look at yours.