Goose-Beaked Whale

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Goose-Beaked Whale

 

(Ziphius cavirostris) a mammal of the family Ziphiidae; it is also known as Cuvier’s beaked whale. The body measures up to 8 m long; the males are slightly smaller than the females. Goose-beaked whales have a conical beak and a low sloping forehead. The color of the whales varies, though most are gray; the head and part of the back of older whales are white. Goose-beaked whales inhabit the warm and temperate waters of all oceans. In the USSR they are found in the seas of the Far East near the Kurile and Komandorskie islands. They feed on cephalopan mollusks. Goose-beaked whales are solitary animals and are rarely seen. They have no commercial value.

REFERENCE

Tomilin, A. G. Kitoobraznye. Moscow, 1957. (Zveri SSSR i prilezhashchikh stran, vol. 9.)
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One evening in 2000, a Cuvier's beaked whale washed up onshore; more followed on nearby islands.
Beaked whales were encountered on 6 occasions, with Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) the most commonly encountered (3 occasions).
Marine scientist Elayne Looker said, based upon Matthew's description, the whale was probably a Cuvier's Beaked Whale, "not commonly seen, but it is not unique to spot it in this area.
Shy species, such as the Cuvier's beaked whale that can dive 3,000 feet below the surface, have taken years to find and monitor.
But for a creature called the Cuvier's beaked whale, hearing starts in the throat, a new study finds.
A post-mortem on the Cuvier's beaked whale, which was found dead on a beach on the Isle of Mull in February, discovered its digestive system had been blocked by black bags.
A dead Cuvier's beaked whale found on the shore near the Manhattan Beach Pier on Friday could be a boon to scientists, who hope to find out more about the rarely seen species, a marine biologist said.
Marine Scientist, Elayne Looker said that from Matthew's description, the whale was probably a Cuvier's Beaked Whale "not commonly seen but it is not unique to spot it in this area.
Washington, Sept 1 (ANI): An international team of researchers has developed an approach that integrates advanced computing, X-ray CT scanners, and modern computational methods that give a 3D simulated look inside the head of a Cuvier's beaked whale, in a bid to understand the effects of noise pollution on marine life better.
Understanding where sound enters the head of the Cuvier's beaked whale could point to the original acoustic pathway for all whales and provide insight into how sonar affects the animals.
Cuvier's beaked whale Ziphius cavirostris Unidentified ziphiid whale Mesoplodon spp.