CyberAngels


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CyberAngels

(CyberAngels Internet Safety Organization, Allentown, PA, www.cyberangels.org) A website that operates as an online program of the inner-city Guardian Angels group and is devoted to education and safety awareness on the Internet. Its all-volunteer help group was founded in 1995 by Gabriel Hatcher, along with Guardian Angels' founder Curtis Sliwa.
References in periodicals archive ?
18, 2009) ("In response to citizens' calls for assistance in dealing with online threats, the Guardian Angels launched CyberAngels in 1995.
Teens write about private feelings and post suggestive pictures of themselves, and then assume that only the people they send it to or that they allow to see it will have access," says Katya Gifford of CyberAngels, an Internet safety organization.
One such group is WiredSafety, formerly known as CyberAngels, led by Parry Aftab, an experienced international attorney and author of The Parent's Guide to Protecting Your Children In Cyberspace and A Parent's Guide to the Internet.
specializes in helping adults, but other organizations can help adults or children confronted with similar situations, including CyberAngels, at www.
CyberAngels, an international internet safety organisation, receives more than 500 complaints of cyberstalking each day, of which up to 100 represent legitimate cases and are investigated further.
Katya Gifford, of American-based internet safety organisation Cyberangels, praised the work the FBI and police in the UK are doing to combat the problem.
One interesting group called CyberAngels (http://www.
Balance of content is administered by a diverse advisory board including, but not limited to, the American Library Association, Cyberangels, Enough is Enough and the International Society for Technology in Education.
Cyberangels, a volunteer organization that assists people who need help online www.
American campaign group Cyberangels returns an average of two children a week to their families from risky internet dates.
Parry Aftab, executive director of Cyberangels, a division of Guardian Angels and the largest online safety and educational program in cyberspace with about 1,200 members, told a Tokyo news conference that Japanese children need to be taught how to "enjoy the Internet safely.
The work of another Cyberangels member, David, 24, has already led to several sites being closed down and some child pornography arrests.