information warfare

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information warfare

Also called "cyberterrorism" and "cyberwarfare," it refers to creating havoc by disrupting the computers that manage stock exchanges, power grids, air traffic control, telecommunications and defense systems. The traditional viruses, Trojans and denial of service attacks are part of the arsenal, all aimed at disrupting a government rather than a company. See virus, Trojan and denial of service attack.

Information warfare is increasingly the first offensive move before the start of a physical attack. The military in many countries have full-time cyberwarriors on the payroll, because the more successful a cyberattack on an early warning defense system, the greater the success of the real attack. For example, according to the book "Cyber War," North Korea may have as many as a thousand hackers stationed in China, working on knocking out systems in South Korea and other countries.

The first book to deal with the subject was "Information Warfare: Chaos on the Electronic Superhighway," written by Winn Schwartau in 1994. Cited above, "Cyber War," by Richard A. Clarke and Robert K. Knake is an eye-opening treatise on the subject, released in 2010.
References in periodicals archive ?
109) Though these may not have been considered examples of cyberterrorism, it is easy to see how these actions could be taken for the purpose of destabilizing governments and/or the international financial system.
A survey of 725 cities conducted by the National League of Cities for the anniversary of the attacks shows that cyberterrorism ranks with biological and chemical weapons atop officials' lists of fears.
The companies found that before 11 September 2002 just 22% of information security professionals were very concerned about cyberterrorism.
Top Concerns of Cities and Anti-Terrorism Planning (Cities 100,000+ population in parentheses) Types of Attack Concerned Addressed in Plans Biological 82% (95%) 70% (89%) Chemical 81 (92) 69 (88) Cyberterrorism 80 (91) 26 (43) Car bomb 70 (91) 44 (73) "Dirty" bomb 67 (86) 29 (54) Radiological 62 (78) 44 (74) Suicide bomber 62 (82) 31 (49) Airplane used as weapon 60 (76) 50 (73) Source: NLC State of Americas Cities Survey, September 2002.
Obviously, we are tremendously vulnerable in the arena of cyberterrorism," Dulek warns.
The task force will also call for preparing domestic laws for signing an international treaty on cyberterrorism.
In fact, it is a heightened awareness of cyberterrorism and a prevalence of e-mail-borne viruses such as Klez, Code Red, or Nimda that has made network security services one of the fastest-growing segments in the business of higher education.
Chapters cover such topics as cyberterrorism and information warfare, cybercrime and security, national and international Codes of Civil Procedure, commercial arbitration, insurance law, litigation, business law, and cross- border insolvencies.
We would like to join hands in thinking of ways to counter cyberterrorism and other (terror threats), which have a serious impact on society,'' Yonemura added.
However, whereas hacktivism is real and widespread, cyberterrorism exists only in theory.