cyclamate

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Related to Cyclamates: aspartame, saccharin

cyclamate

(sī'kləmāt', –mət), any member of a group of salts of cyclamic acid (cyclohexanesulfamic acid). The sodium and calcium salts were commonly used as artificial sweetenerssweetener, artificial,
substance used as a low-calorie sugar substitute. Saccharin, cyclamates, and aspartame have been the most commonly used artificial sweeteners. Saccharin, a coal-tar derivative three hundred times as sweet as sugar, was discovered in 1879.
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 until 1969, when their use was banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration after reports that ingestion of large quantities of cyclamates appeared to cause cancer in some animals. There is no evidence that cyclamates are associated with cancer in humans.

cyclamate

[′sī·klə‚māt]
(organic chemistry)
The calcium or sodium salt of cyclohexylsulfamate, an artificial sweetener.
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem is the public know nothing about cyclamates and what they might do.
Sodium cyclamate was outlawed in Britain in 1969 after tests on laboratory animals shrivelled their testicles and cut their sperm count.
If this drink is sweetened with cyclamate it would contain 145mg of the chemical - a third more than the commission's acceptable level.
It may have further aggravated a bad situation as concerned consumers realized that Coca-Cola, although it did not use cyclamates, did not think enough about its customers to alleviate their fears.
Cyclamates were banned after researchers in the late 1960s concluded that cyclamate/saccharin mixtures--used mostly to sweeten diet soft drinks-- caused cancer in rats; some scientists have argued ever since that saccharin, and not cyclamate, was the carcinogen.
However, the committee calls for more epidemiologic research on the link between cyclamates and this and other types of cancer.
Cyclamate, an artificial sweetener that has been banned in the United States since 1970 due to suspicions that it causes cancer, may speed up cancer development in the presence of other, carcinogenic substances--but it does not by itself start the process, a National Research Council committee announced this week.
A REVIEW OF SELECT SEGMENTS II-11 Table 11: Sweetener Prices in 2013 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-11 Acesulfame Potassium II-11 Sucralose II-12 Table 12: Global Market for Sucralose by End-Use Market (2013): Percentage Share Breakdown of Volume Sales for Beverages, Food and Pharmaceutical Categories (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-12 Chinese Producers Cause Oversupply II-12 Saccharin II-13 Aspartame - The Largest Selling Intense Sweetener II-13 Cyclamate II-14 Neotame II-15
Saccharin II-39 Sucralose II-39 Benefits of Sucralose Vs Aspartame II-40 Neotame II-40 Cyclamate II-41 Alitame II-41 Neohesperidine II-41 Lead Acetate II-41 Other Substitutes to Sugar II-42 Sugar Substitutes: Defined II-42 Commonly Used Natural Sugar Substitutes II-42 Table 25: Energy Densities and Sweetness of Select Natural Sugar Substitutes in Relation to Sucrose II-42 Commonly Used Artificial Sugar Substitutes II-42 Natural Sweeteners II-43 Steviosides (or Stevia) II-43 History of Stevia II-43 Limitations on Use II-44 Tagatose II-44 Thaumatin II-44 Ceresweet II-44 Organic Agave Sweetener II-45 Sugar Alcohols (or Polyols) II-45 Dextrose II-45