cylinder

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Related to Cylinders: Gas cylinders

cylinder,

in mathematics, surface generated by a line moving parallel to a given fixed line and continually intersecting a given fixed curve called the directrix; each line of the family of lines forming the cylinder is called a ruling, or generator. If the directrix is a conic sectionconic section
or conic
, curve formed by the intersection of a plane and a right circular cone (conical surface). The ordinary conic sections are the circle, the ellipse, the parabola, and the hyperbola.
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 (e.g., a circle or a parabola), the cylinder is called a quadric cylinder. The commonest type of cylinder is the right circular cylinder, in which the directrix is a circle and the lines forming the cylinder are all perpendicular to the plane of the circle. The solid bounded by a cylindrical surface and two parallel planes intersecting the surface in closed curves is also called a cylinder. The perpendicular distance between the planes is the altitude of the cylinder. The volume of the cylinder is equal to the product of the altitude and the area of the base (the area enclosed by either closed curve).

Cylinder

 

a machine component with a cylindrical chamber in which a piston or plunger can move, thereby changing the volume of the compartment formed on either side of the piston or plunger.

In a cylinder, the energy of a working substance (steam or a fuel-air mixture), which exerts pressure on the piston, may be converted into the energy of the piston motion, as in the case of heat engines; alternatively, the energy of the piston motion may be converted into the energy of a liquid or gas, as in the case of pumps or compressors. If the compartment formed on one side of the piston is used, the cylinder is sealed at one end by a head cover. However, if the compartments formed on both sides of the piston are used, two head covers are provided, along with a push-rod that connects the piston to a slide block.

In reciprocating hydraulic and pneumatic drives—such as those used in metalcutting machine tools, presses, and hoists—and in certain reciprocating engines, the cylinder is a single component. In multicylinder reciprocating engines—for example, internal-combustion engines—the cylinders are frequently housed together in a cylinder block, where they may be arranged in a line (an in-line engine), at an angle (a V-engine), or opposite one another (an opposed-cylinder engine). In pumps and in rotary variable-speed hydraulic engines, the cylinders are often located in the rotor and are arranged radially or parallel to the axis of the rotor.

N. IA. NIBERG


Cylinder

 

a body bounded by a closed cylindrical surface and two parallel planes that intersect the cylindrical surface. The two parallel planes are called the bases of the cylinder. If the bases are perpendicular to the elements, the cylinder is a right cylinder. In particular, if the bases are circles, the cylinder is a right circular, or circular, cylinder; such a cylinder is often referred to simply as a cylinder. The volume of a right circular cylinder is V = πr2h, and the lateral area is S = 2πrh, where r is the radius of the base and h is the altitude of the cylinder. [28–1678–1 ]

cylinder

[′sil·ən·dər]
(civil engineering)
A steel tube 10-60 inches (25-152 centimeters) in diameter with a wall at least ⅛ inch (3 millimeters) thick that is driven into bedrock, excavated inside, filled with concrete, and used as a pile foundation.
A domed, closed tank for storing hot water to be drawn off at taps. Also known as storage calorifier.
(computer science)
The virtual cylinder represented by the tracks of equal radius of a set of disks on a disk drive.
(engineering)
A container used to hold and transport compressed gas for various pressurized applications.
The piston chamber in a pump from which the liquid is expelled.
(mathematics)
A solid bounded by a cylindrical surface and two parallel planes, or the surface of such a solid.
(mechanical engineering)

cylinder

In a lock, the cylindrically shaped assembly containing the tumbler mechanism and the keyway, which can be actuated only by the correct keys.

cylinder

1. Maths a solid consisting of two parallel planes bounded by identical closed curves, usually circles, that are interconnected at every point by a set of parallel lines, usually perpendicular to the planes. Volume base area × length.
2. a surface formed by a line moving round a closed plane curve at a fixed angle to it
3. Engineering the chamber in a reciprocating internal-combustion engine, pump, or compressor within which the piston moves
4. Archaeology a cylindrical seal of stone, clay, or precious stone decorated with linear designs, found in the Middle East and Balkans: dating from about 6000 bc

cylinder

(storage)
The set of tracks on a multi-headed disk that may be accessed without head movement. That is, the collection of disk tracks which are the same distance from the spindle about which the disks rotate. Each such group forms the shape of a cylinder. Placing data that are likely to be accessed together in cylinders reduces the access significantly as head movement (seeking) is slow compared to disk rotation and switching between heads.

cylinder

The aggregate of all tracks that reside in the same location on every disk surface. On multiple-platter disks, the cylinder is the sum total of every track with the same track number on every surface. On a floppy disk, a cylinder comprises the top and corresponding bottom track.

When storing data, the operating system fills an entire cylinder before moving to the next one. The access arm remains stationary until all the tracks in the cylinder have been read or written.


Cylinder
The cylinder is the aggregate of the same track number on every platter used for recording.
References in classic literature ?
He accordingly set the phonograph at a slow pace, and I began to typewrite from the beginning of the seventeenth cylinder.
It was the clank of the levers and the swish of the leaking cylinder.
She's no use: I've got all the records I want of the Lisson Grove lingo; and I'm not going to waste another cylinder on it.
He gave me the amused hand-shake and encouraging smile which the head master bestows upon the small boy, and, having greeted the others and helped to collect their bags and their cylinders of oxygen, he stowed us and them away in a large motor-car which was driven by the same impassive Austin, the man of few words, whom I had seen in the character of butler upon the occasion of my first eventful visit to the Professor.
Nor does there seem to me any great difficulty in a single insect (as in the case of a queen-wasp) making hexagonal cells, if she work alternately on the inside and outside of two or three cells commenced at the same time, always standing at the proper relative distance from the parts of the cells just begun, sweeping spheres or cylinders, and building up intermediate planes.
I hurled these at the stranger bulls," and she held forth another handful of the shiny metal cylinders with the dull gray, cone-shaped ends.
The wood-encased bulk of the low-pressure cylinder, frowning portly from above, emitted a faint wheeze at every thrust, and except for that low hiss the engines worked their steel limbs headlong or slow with a silent, determined smoothness.
He did not remember hearing any birds that morning, there was certainly no breeze stirring, and the only sounds were the faint movements from within the cindery cylinder.
You will now readily understand, gentlemen, the apparatus that I have described to you is really a gas cylinder and blow-pipe for oxygen and hydrogen, the heat of which exceeds that of a forge fire.
For the body he stripped a sheet of thick bark from around a big tree, and with much labor fashioned it into a cylinder of about the right size, pinning the edges together with wooden pegs.
Roughly, it is a steel cylinder a hundred feet long, and jointed so that it may turn and twist through solid rock if need be.
No boots remained, if the man had worn boots, but there were several buckles scattered about suggesting that a great part of his trappings had been of leather, while just beneath the bones of one hand lay a metal cylinder about eight inches long and two inches in diameter.