Cyme


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

Cyme

(sī`mē), ancient Greek city of W Asia Minor, on the Ionian Sea and N of the present Smyrna in W Asian Turkey. It was the largest and most important of the 12 cities of Aeolis. In the late 5th cent. B.C., Cyme struggled to be free of Persian domination but was only intermittently successful. Later it was a city of the Seleucids and ultimately of Rome.

Cyme

 

an inflorescence in the course of whose development each axis terminates in a flower and ceases to grow early. The lateral axes, that is, the branches of the inflorescence, outgrow the cyme. There may be a single lateral axis (monochasium), two lateral axes (dichasium), or more than two lateral axes (pleiochasium), all of which terminate in a flower.

cyme

[sīm]
(botany)
An inflorescence in which each main axis terminates in a single flower; secondary and tertiary axes may also have flowers, but with shorter flower stalks.

cyme

an inflorescence in which the first flower is the terminal bud of the main stem and subsequent flowers develop as terminal buds of lateral stems
References in periodicals archive ?
With best-in-class modeling capabilities and extensive industry knowledge, Eaton is helping utility and industrial customers build an adaptable, secure and responsive infrastructure, said Daniel Desrosiers, services director at Eaton s CYME business.
a cyme in older terminology) has a terminal flower, and each side branch, or "paracladium," can branch repeatedly.
CYME International is a major supplier of Electric Power Engineering Software with clients in some 100 countries.
The transaction is conditional upon the approval of the Board of Directors of COGNICASE, other usual conditions including satisfactory due diligence, as well as the absence of material adverse change in the business and financial conditions of CYME.
The CYME product is an excellent fit for FastGate," according to Larry Kuhl, vice president of partnerships and business development at Coherent Networks.
The tree has small green-yellow flowers with short peduncles (1 to 5 mm) and cymes, which are located beside the leaves.
The inflorescence of blowout penstemon is a thyrse characterized by a series of pairs of opposite leafy bracts subtending individual cymes, called verticillasters, of two to eight flowers (Great Plains Flora Association 1986).
Flowers are in many flowered irregular corymbose cymes, white or violet coloured tinge.
The flowers appear to fit a generalist insect pollination syndrome as they are small and actinomorphic with white to yellowish or greenish petals, presented in dense clusters of racemose cymes (Fig.
Jack Hofer of Itta Bena and the late Marjorie Cymes Hofer of Memphis.
The flowers of yarrow are known as cymes and appear as flat-topped clusters, up to 6 inches across in some varieties, of many small blooms.