Cynewulf


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Related to Cynewulf: Caedmon, Cædmon

Cynewulf

(kĭn`əwo͝olf', ko͝on`–), fl. early 9th cent.?, Old English religious poet of Northumbria or Mercia. Four poems have been ascribed to him on the evidence of his signatures in runes in the text of each of these poems. The poems, all more explicitly didactic than any earlier works, are: Juliana, The Ascension, Elene, and The Fates of the Apostles. Other poems, formerly thought his, are now attributed to poets of the "Cynewulf school."

Bibliography

See The Poems of Cynewulf (tr. by C. W. Kennedy, 1949); E. R. Anderson, Cynewulf: Structure, Style, and Theme in His Poetry (1983).

Cynewulf

, Kynewulf, Cynwulf
?8th century ad, Anglo-Saxon poet; author of Juliana, The Ascension, Elene, and The Fates of the Apostles
References in periodicals archive ?
Claes Schaar, Critical Studies in the Cynewulf Group (New York: Haskell House, 1967 [Reprinted from Lund, 1949]), 35-36, 71-73.
Allowing us to establish quite detailed acquaintance with Cynewulfs medieval opus, Cotter most convincingly demonstrates Hopkins' potential borrowing from that work when he compares Hopkins' sense of his "fling[ing] of [his own] heart to the heart of the Host" ("Wreck," st.
Andreas," which is probably not by Cynewulf, goes the farthest in illustrating a holy warrior, whose virtues of active violence are identical to those of Anglo-Saxon heroes.
Greenfield and Calder (1986: 167) in their New History of Old English Literature state that "as poetry, Juliana is the least impressive of the Cynewulf group, its diction being rather prosaic and repetitive, its syntax rather loose".
The re is, for instance, some very welcome creative discussion of personal authorial style in Momma's and Orchard's examinations of AElfric and Cynewulf, which should with luck make a difference in a discipline replete with anonymous and misattributed texts.
The three poems, "Advent," "The Ascension," and "The Last Judgment," written in the second half of the eighth century, have been attributed to Cynewulf whose runic signature is inscribed into the final lines of "The Ascension.
Cynewulf has been placed in the first half of the ninth century and The Phoenix is 'no earlier than the time of Cynewulf' by Fulk, datings accepted by Hutcheson.
The poem was once (but is no longer) attributed to Caedmon or Cynewulf.
The Latin poets wrote acrostic verse, and the early English poet Cynewulf signed his name to his works in acrostic runes.
In Ascension, Cynewulf follows Gregory in elaborating on the suggestion of the apostles' weakness and lack of understanding present in Mark 16:14 and other biblical accounts, but, in doing so, he goes beyond what is merely hinted at in Gregory's exegesis of these passages, and takes the idea in a very different direction.
19a) 755 Her Cynewulf benam Sigebryht his rices and westseaxna wiotan for unryhtum daedum, buton Hamtunscire.
At Juliana 686-8, when the wicked followers of Eleusius are drowned at sea, Cynewulf comments on how futile it is now for them to seek treasure from their lord, 'that they in the wine-hall on the beer-bench should receive rings, aepplede gold':