Cynipoidea


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Cynipoidea

[‚sin·ə′pȯid·ē·ə]
(invertebrate zoology)
A superfamily of hymenopteran insects in the suborder Apocrita.

Cynipoidea

 

a superfamily of hymenopterous insects that usually develop in plant tissues and cause the formation of galls. Occasionally, the Cynipoidea parasitize larvae of other insects that live in plant tissues. The body is black and measures 1–5 mm long; the wings contain few veins. The larvae are legless, C-shaped, and white. The galls formed by the insects have a shape and structure that is characteristic of each species of Cynipoidea; they are especially varied on oak trees and Rosaceae. There are about 1,900 species of Cynipoidea, mostly distributed in the northern hemisphere.

The summer offspring of Cynipoidea are bisexual and the spring offspring, parthenogenic. The structure of galls formed by bisexual and parthenogenic generations differs. The Cynipoidea that parasitize the larvae of such insects as the cabbage, turnip, and onion maggots are beneficial in that they destroy agricultural pests.

References in periodicals archive ?
The mature larva of Synergus filicornis is similar in general appearance to other Cynipoidea (Evans 1987; Nieves-Aldrey et al.
2005): "Undoubtedly, further study of immature stages of Cynipoidea will be rewarding from the perspectives of both phylogeny and larval identification.
In the Afrotropical region, the superfamily Cynipoidea is represented by 306 described species and 54 genera, but there are hundreds more species yet to be described, adds Buffington, who coauthored a paper describing the monograph in the April 2015 issue of the journal ZooKeys.
It standardizes description of Cynipoidea wasps in the Afrotropical Region.
Species occurring in Poland (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Anacharitidae).
Phylogeny, classification and evolution of the Cynipoidea.
It is particularly common among the Cynipoidea, including the Figitidae, a family that includes a number of parasitoids of Diptera and several well-known natural enemies of tephritids (Ovruski et al.
Parasitism behavior of three species of Eucoilinae (Hymenoptera: Cynipoidea, Figitidae) parasitoids of fruit flies (Diptera).