cytotoxic T cell

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Related to Cytotoxic T cells: Helper T cells

cytotoxic T cell

[¦sīd·ə‚täk·sik ′tē ‚sel]
(immunology)
A type of T cell which protects against pathogens that invade host cell cytoplasm, where they cannot be bound by antibodies, by recognizing and killing the host cell before the pathogens can proliferate and escape.
References in periodicals archive ?
The demonstration that infused cytotoxic T cells can migrate to lymph nodes, the major site of HIV-1 replication -- and that this is associated with greater cytotoxic activity against HIV-1 in the lymph nodes -- provides hope that this form of therapy may benefit HIV-1 infected persons.
The cells then transport the combination to the cell surface so that cytotoxic T cells can have access to them.
In this preclinical study, human NK cells and cytotoxic T cells were treated in vitro with interferon-alpha, with or without Ceplene.
The data, published in the December issue of Nature Biotechnology, highlights a method for modifying targets on cancer cells called antigens to facilitate activation of cytotoxic T cells -- a key component of the immune system responsible for destroying cancerous cells.
Tumor antigens are the signals to the cytotoxic T cells of the immune system that are responsible for killing tumor cells.
Two kinds of immune cells, NK cells and cytotoxic T cells, possess an ability to kill and support the killing of cancer cells and virally infected cells.
Cytotoxic T Cells, or killer T cells, are activated by binding to specific epitopes presented by infected cells or other antigen-presenting cells.
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