D'Artagnan


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D’Artagnan

Dumas’s ever-popular chivalrous character. [Fr. Lit.: The Three Musketeers]

D’Artagnan

challenges horseman, rescues a lady, and earns fame as a doughty soldier. [Fr. Lit.: Dumas The Three Musketeers]
See: Heroism
References in classic literature ?
since, in our romance of "The Three Musketeers," we took leave of D'Artagnan at No.
Notwithstanding his commission in the musketeers, D'Artagnan felt completely solitary.
From the time D'Artagnan took quarters in that hotel, the mistress of the house, a pretty and fresh looking Flemish woman, twenty-five or twenty-six years old, had been singularly interested in him; and after certain love passages, much obstructed by an inconvenient husband to whom a dozen times D'Artagnan had made a pretence of passing a sword through his body, that husband had disappeared one fine morning, after furtively selling certain choice lots of wine, carrying away with him money and jewels.
Now, we must have badly painted the character of our adventure seeker, or our readers must have already perceived that D'Artagnan was not an ordinary man; therefore, while repeating to himself that his death was inevitable, he did not make up his mind to die quietly, as one less courageous and less restrained might have done in his place.
In addition to this, D'Artagnan possessed that invincible stock of resolution which the counsels of his father had implanted in his heart: "Endure nothing from anyone but the king, the cardinal, and Monsieur de Treville.
When D'Artagnan arrived in sight of the bare spot of ground which extended along the foot of the monastery, Athos had been waiting about five minutes, and twelve o'clock was striking.
In which D'Artagnan begins to fear he has placed his Money and that of Planchet in the Sinking Fund
Before he left Calais, D'Artagnan had had made in that city a sort of coffin, large and deep enough for a man to turn in it at his ease.
D'Artagnan was so well acquainted with his crew and his prisoner, that during the whole voyage he had been in dread of two things: either that the general would prefer death to this sort of imprisonment, and would smother himself by endeavoring to speak, or that his guards would allow themselves to be tempted by the offers of the prisoner, and put him, D'Artagnan, into the box instead of Monk.
In about ten minutes Moliere reappeared, making another sign to D'Artagnan from under the hangings.
there are two days yet; 'tis much more than you require, Monsieur Percerin," said D'Artagnan, in the coolest possible manner.
Percerin raised his head with the air of a man little accustomed to be contradicted, even in his whims; but D'Artagnan did not pay the least attention to the airs which the illustrious tailor began to assume.