cycloserine

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cycloserine

[¦sī·klō′se‚rēn]
(microbiology)
C3H6O2N2 Broad-spectrum, crystalline antibiotic produced by several species of Streptomyces; useful in the treatment of tuberculosis and urinary-tract infections caused by resistant gram-negative bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
The task force report concluded that "Among the other NMDA antagonists studied to date, most intriguing are the recent studies of high-dose D-cycloserine and rapastinel.
However, D-Cycloserine injections to other brain regions didn't help the rats.
Additional clinical proof of concept studies have demonstrated the potential benefits of D-cycloserine in treating a variety of anxiety disorders including Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and OCD, amongst others.
But those taking D-cycloserine learned much more quickly to overcome their fear in two sessions rather than the usual eight.
Besides, the report provides d-cycloserine prices in regional markets.
is pioneering a staged treatment approach in which ketamine administration is followed by a combination of D-cycloserine and an FDA-approved mood stabilizer in order to maintain the ketamine effect.
An antibiotic used as a second-line treatment for tuberculosis, D-cycloserine is a partial glycine agonist that binds with glutamate at the NMDA receptor to promote calcium conductance and normalize NMDA neurotransmission.
A recently published randomized double-blind study showed that patients with acrophobia who had exposure therapy combined with d-cycloserine had significantly larger reductions in their symptoms than did patients who received placebo (Arch.
And an analogue of d-serine, d-cycloserine "is also active at the glycine co-agonist site of NMDA receptors.
He and his colleagues therefore turned to D-cycloserine, a compound best known as an antibiotic for treating tuberculosis.
There were no significant differences in SANS scores or on a composite neuropsychological measure, suggesting that neither glycine nor D-cycloserine is effective for negative symptoms or cognitive impairments (Am.
MONTREAL -- The addition of D-cycloserine to cognitive-behavioral therapy for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder showed little or no benefit over placebo, based on several studies presented at the meeting.