DNA computing

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DNA computing

(architecture)
The use of DNA molecules to encode computational problems. Standard operations of molecular biology can then be used to solve some NP-hard search problems in parallel using a very large number of molecules. The exponential scaling of NP-hard problems still remains, so this method will require a huge amount of DNA to solve large problems.

[L. M. Adleman, "Molecular Computation of Solutions to Combinatorial Problems", Science 266:1021-1024, 1994].
References in periodicals archive ?
In practical terms, a DNA computer bears similarity to a biochemical machine in which biochemical events perform algorithms and execute programs by manipulating DNA strands in a series of carefully orchestrated biochemical processes.
Once researchers are able to design reliable DNA computers that make a mistake only once every 10 billion times, say, then I think people will become comfortable with the idea.
For now, there are a lot of things that this DNA computer can't do.
A microlitre of solution containing the molecules could theoretically hold up to three trillion DNA computers, the scientists claim.
First, because it's in its infancy, most existing DNA computers consist of only synthetic, made-to-order DNA strands attached to gold plates on one end, with the other end floating freely in test tubes or petri dishes that are linked to myriad scientific devices in university labs.
Japan's major precision-instruments maker said the main feature of what it calls the ''world's first functional DNA computer for gene analysis'' is that it reduces the time required for gene expression profiling to about six hours from three days typically taken by the conventional manual process with DNA microarrays.
In a DNA computer, computation takes place in test tubes.
Under proposals in the Bill a DNA computer database will be set up to help detectives track down and prosecute crooks from evidence left at crime scenes.
President Tsuyoshi Kikukawa) has announced the successful development of the world's first functional DNA computer for gene analysis, an area with enormous projected research- and analysis-related demand.
A team of researchers has now added two new operations to DNA's biocomputing bag of tricks--tools that they will need eventually to build a DNA computer.
If successful, the results will be checked against a national DNA computer base of known offenders in the hope of providing a positive match.