DNA computing


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DNA computing

(architecture)
The use of DNA molecules to encode computational problems. Standard operations of molecular biology can then be used to solve some NP-hard search problems in parallel using a very large number of molecules. The exponential scaling of NP-hard problems still remains, so this method will require a huge amount of DNA to solve large problems.

[L. M. Adleman, "Molecular Computation of Solutions to Combinatorial Problems", Science 266:1021-1024, 1994].
References in periodicals archive ?
In this section, three typical BIAs inspired from different levels of life are given out in detail, respectively, namely, DNA Computing (the level of chromosome), Membrane Computing (the level of cell), and Artificial Immune System (the level of system).
They tried to find an efficient algorithm based on DNA computing concepts to solve NP-problems like the directed Hamilton path, SAT problem, N-Queen problem, etc.
DNA computing is an inter-disciplinary area concerned with the use of DNA molecules for the implementation of computational processes.
Biomolecular Pushdown Automaton Based on the DNA Computing.
The disadvantage of DNA computing is that until now, molecular computation has been used with 'exact' and 'brute-force' algorithms.
The DNA computing field was initially developed by "Leonard Adleman" of the University of Southern California.
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Ramadevi); (15) An Introduction to DNA Computing (C.
Shapiro and his team at Weizmann introduced the first autonomous programmable DNA computing device in 2001.
Nowadays computing or information processing has become popular both literally and metaphorically for conceptualizing all sorts of scientific processes, from information-theoretic approaches in neuroscience to advances in quantum information theory and DNA computing.
Here consultant Waldner surveys the next generation, including quantum computing, nanotubes in molecular transistors and DNA computing.
A 5 [micro]L sample can contain as much as 15,000 trillion of these DNA computing devices, carrying out 330 trillion operations/sec at a 99.