DNA

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Related to DNA deletion: nucleotide deletion, Deletions

DNA:

see nucleic acidnucleic acid,
any of a group of organic substances found in the chromosomes of living cells and viruses that play a central role in the storage and replication of hereditary information and in the expression of this information through protein synthesis.
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DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)

See GENETICS.

DNA

(biochemistry)

DNA

deoxyribonucleic acid; a nucleic acid that is the main constituent of the chromosomes of all organisms (except some viruses). The DNA molecule consists of two polynucleotide chains in the form of a double helix, containing phosphate and the sugar deoxyribose and linked by hydrogen bonds between the complementary bases adenine and thymine or cytosine and guanine. DNA is self-replicating, plays a central role in protein synthesis, and is responsible for the transmission of hereditary characteristics from parents to offspring

DNA

(1) See Windows DNA.

(2) (Digital Network Architecture) Introduced in 1978, it was Digital's umbrella term for its enterprise network architecture based on DECnet.
References in periodicals archive ?
But when DNA deletions were added to the same test panels, detection rates rose to 95 percent.
An analysis of DNA deletions and duplications in the tumors that developed in mice suggests the initiating mutation strongly influences which additional mutations provide a selective advantage to the rogue cell.
Scientists are discovering molecular signatures by analysis of gene expression at the RNA level, gene expression following protein translation, gene mutations, DNA deletions, DNA amplifications, epigenetic changes of DNA, and posttranslational modification of proteins.
Southern blot analysis of DNA from pedigrees with XLA cases showed restriction fragment length alterations that segregated in an X-linked recessive pattern; detailed analysis disclosed either genomic DNA deletions in the region encompassing Btk or missense point mutations resulting in nonconservative amino acid substitutions at important residues in the putative protein-tyrosine kinase domain (89).
Gail Kansky, President, stated, "The Foundation's real revelation came when our staff linked specific research on mitochondrial DNA deletions, first published by Australian scientists in 1995, to work published by scientists in Ireland in 2005.
Mental retardation is caused by many different, yet individually rare DNA deletions and duplications.