genetic fingerprinting

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genetic fingerprinting

[jə¦ned·ik ′fiŋ·gər‚print·iŋ]
(forensic science)
A forensic identification technique that enables virtually 100% discrimination between individuals from small samples of blood or semen, using probes for hypervariable minisatellite deoxyribonucleic acid. Also known as DNA fingerprinting.
(cell and molecular biology)
Identification of chemical entities in animal tissues as indicative of the presence of specific genes.
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230) States are free to preempt the invocation of the federal right by granting DNA evidence requests for death row inmates under state post-conviction statutes.
The DNA evidence at the time was not yet available, but for the preliminary inquiry, I believe they will have a complete file.
The case of an arsonist trapped by DNA evidence has highlighted how useful scientific evidence has become for police in securing convictions
At any rate, the bill would not make convictions automatic, even with solid DNA evidence.
Connolly, spokesman for the Worcester district attorney's office, said even though the DNA evidence did not match Mr.
There was no DNA evidence in that incident, officials said.
His defence was expected to explain the DNA evidence by saying he was a drug dealer whose customers were mainly prostitutes who often paid in trade.
Specifically, the law requires the courts to inquire into the existence of such DNA evidence prior to accepting the plea.
Nationally, seven inmates who entered into plea agreements have later been cleared by DNA evidence.
Anyone having cases similar to the described modus operandi with the suspect's DNA evidence should contact Crime Analyst Vicki McRoberts, Corvallis, Oregon, Police Department at 541-766-6989 or Crime Analyst Ken Whitla of the ViCAP Unit at 703-632-4254.
Though proponents of the death penalty claim that the threat of harsh punishment is responsible for the decline, many experts feel that juries are less inclined to recommend death, particularly with the availability of life-without-parole sentences and the number of death-row inmates who have been exonerated by DNA evidence.
This book offers a comprehensive review of the steps and processes that surround DNA evidence making its way into court.