genetic marker

(redirected from DNA marker)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to DNA marker: DNA ladder, Genetic markers

genetic marker

[jə¦ned·ik ′märk·ər]
(genetics)
A gene whose phenotypic expression is easily discerned and thereby can be used to identify an individual or a cell that carries it, or as a probe to mark a nucleus, chromosome, or locus.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, DNA markers are found in abundance and are not influenced by the environment or developmental stage of a plant, making them ideal for genetic relationships studies (Reddy et al.
Perhaps the most unusual security method, one that became available to customers Novemer 1 of this year, is the application of DNA markers to the boxes and labels.
Finding more fragments means researchers have a greater chance of finding DNA markers for genes that control desirable traits.
nobilis were constructed by analyzing the segregation of AFLP and microsatellite DNA markers in 80 F1 progenies, which furnished a basic tool kit for C.
Genetics similarity among four breeds of sheep in Egypt detected by random amplified polymorphic DNA markers.
Whereas DNA-based molecular markers are stable in many applications, they are unsuitable for use in nuclease-containing samples such as tissue; we do not, for example, observe any significant signal arising from 200 nM DNA markers stored for 10 days in blood serum.
Optaglio will offer the DNA marker on its hybrid labels which combine diffractive devices as the overt element with printed graphics and other authentication features.
Maps, by establishing the location, order, and relative distance of genes, anonymous DNA markers, and biologically important traits along a species' chromosomes, are critical tools in analyzing genetic contribution to a given disease state.
Whereas in Pakistan race 2 from Thal area whereas a biotype of race 6 was identified from Thar and Faisalabad regions based on DNA markers and conventional data (Ali, 2014).
These DNA sequences are useful resources for developing DNA markers.
We then explored differentially methylated CpG sites in the placenta and in maternal blood cells as possible fetus-specific DNA markers in maternal plasma.