genetic fingerprinting

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genetic fingerprinting

[jə¦ned·ik ′fiŋ·gər‚print·iŋ]
(forensic science)
A forensic identification technique that enables virtually 100% discrimination between individuals from small samples of blood or semen, using probes for hypervariable minisatellite deoxyribonucleic acid. Also known as DNA fingerprinting.
(cell and molecular biology)
Identification of chemical entities in animal tissues as indicative of the presence of specific genes.
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He added that this could be the last free DNA testing done by the Ministry of Interior.
It is at the forefront of technology with the invention of the Q-POC - a DNA testing lab reduced to the size of an iPad.
It is now at the forefront of technology with the invention of the Q-POC - a DNA testing lab reduced to the size of an iPad.
Ireland will lead the way in putting in place permanent mechanisms that will incorporate DNA testing into food safety cheques that we already have.
Criminal defense lawyers continue to find old cases where there may be real questions about guilt, and where DNA testing could establish innocence, but where testing is impossible because prosecutors either destroyed or failed to properly preserve biological evidence.
Human papillomavirus DNA testing for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 and cancer: 5-year follow-up of a randomised controlled implementation trial.
WOLVERHAMPTON'S first walk-in DNA testing clinic opens its doors next Monday.
A House bill to remove the deadline for convicted inmates to request DNA testing in an effort to prove their innocence has cleared its first hurdle.
Joseph had to get a court to review what had happened at the trial and to order the advanced DNA testing that had become possible and that could prove his innocence.
launched in September 2003 a DNA testing service called IGENITY[TM] that helps shape producers' breeding, managing and marketing decisions.
The moderate Democratic candidate responded, not by questioning the propriety of such a proposal, but by promising to introduce a law that would require DNA testing of everyone arrested for any offense.
This study removes the potential doubt about the continued validity of DNA testing, necessary information for federal and state law enforcement agencies and prosecutors.