DNS

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DNS

(fluid mechanics)
(computer science)

DNS

(1)

DNS

(2)
Distributed Name Service. See DECdns.

DNS

(Domain Name System) The Internet's system for converting alphabetic names into numeric IP addresses. For example, when a Web address (URL) is typed into a browser, DNS servers return the IP address of the Web server associated with that name. In this made-up example, the DNS converts the URL www.company.com into the IP address 204.0.8.51. Without DNS, you would have to type the series of four numbers and dots into your browser to retrieve the website, which you actually can do. See IP address.

A Hierarchy of Servers
The DNS system is a hierarchy of duplicated database servers worldwide that begin with the "root servers" for the top-level domains (.com, .net, .org, etc.). The root servers point to the "authoritative" servers located in ISPs, as well as in large companies, that turn the names into IP addresses; the process known as "name resolution." Using our www.company.com example, COMPANY.COM is the domain name, and WWW is the hostname. The domain name is the organization's identity on the Web, and the hostname is the name of the Web server within that domain (see WWW). See DNS records, zone file, reverse DNS, recursive DNS, DDNS, HOSTS file, mDNS, ping, root server and WINS.


Getting a Web Page
Converting the domain name (URL) in a Web browser into an IP address takes numerous queries. Along the way, there can be more name servers than are shown here.







Caching Speeds Up Delivery
If the ABC.COM Web address was previously requested by one of the ISP's customers, its IP address is cached (stored) in the DNS server and returns the IP address immediately. A user's computer also typically caches IP addresses, which can eliminate the DNS query all together if the address is already in the cache.
References in periodicals archive ?
Roberts, Bellport, NY, received his DNSc from Columbia University, June 2005.
SHARON ECK BIRMINGHAM, DNSc, MA, BSN, RN, is Chief Nursing Executive, Eck Birmingham & Associates, Hillsborough, NC; and Adjunct Faculty at the Universities of North Carolina, Iowa, Colorado, and Yale.
Denise Thornton-Orr, DNSc, RN, NEA-BC, was recently appointed as a Reviewer Team Leader for the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.
The committee includes one advanced practice registered nurse, Andrea Brassard, RN, DNSc, MPH, FNP.
Gilliss earned her MSN degree in 1974 from the Catholic University of America and her DNSc degree in 1983 from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where she completed her postdoctoral studies, joined the School of Nursing faculty, and from 1993 to 1998 was professor and chair of the Department of Family Health Care.
Anita Catlin, DNSc, FNP, FAAN, is a Professor of Nursing and Ethics Consultant, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA, and a Columnist, Ethics, Issues, & Commentary column, Pediatric Nursing.
Chesla, DNSc, RN, FAAN; New York: Springer Publishing, 2009, 528 pages; $60.
BY TERI WURMSER, PHD, MPH, RN, NEA-BC; JANE BLISS-HOLTZ, DNSC, RN-BC; FRANKLIN BECKER, PHD; AND KATHRYN COLLINS, MPA, FACHE
Marcia Bosek, DNSc, RN followed with a presentation on Nursing, Ethics, and Technology.
Linda Bucher, RN, DNSc, AACN board member, traveled to Santa Rosa de Copan, Honduras, for the World Journey of Smiles.
Gretchen McNeely, DNSc, RN, Associate Dean and Associate Professor MSU-Bozeman College of Nursing
Lieutenant Colonel Caterina Lasome, Tricare Management Activity, Falls Church, VA; Colonel (retired) Nancy Staggers, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Utah College of Nursing; and Colonel (retired) Bonnie Jennings, DNSc, RN, FAAN, Health Care Consultant, Alexandria, VA are Co-Principal Investigators for a recently awarded $3.