DR-DOS


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DR-DOS

An earlier multitasking DOS-compatible operating system from DRDOS, Inc., Lindon, Utah. DR-DOS was used in embedded systems, thin clients and bootable disks for antivirus recovery programs. The embedded version included display antialiasing so that it could be used in TV set-top boxes. A graphics-based browser was also available that let old 386 computers access the Internet.

An Illustrious History
DR-DOS was developed by Digital Research, the creators of the CP/M operating system (see CPM). It was popular during the late 1980s and early 1990s because it added many features lacking in MS-DOS, including memory management and disk compression. DR-DOS motivated Microsoft to improve subsequent versions of MS-DOS and also keep DR-DOS from succeeding.

A Lot of Moving Around
In 1991, Digital Research was acquired by Novell, which later sold DR-DOS to Caldera. Since Caldera owned the history of the product, it sued Microsoft in 1999 for antitrust violations. The case was later settled. Caldera then spun off DR-DOS to Lineo, Inc., a Canopy company, where it was enhanced for the embedded market. In 2002, DeviceLogics acquired the product. A couple years later, DeviceLogics changed its name to DRDOS, Inc. See DOS.
References in periodicals archive ?
14) If an OEM shipped a machine with a competing operating system, say PC-DOS or DR-DOS, it would receive no reduction in its payment to Microsoft.
Just as in its Statement of Fact last week (CI No 3,650), Caldera still maintains that Microsoft used vaporware announcements, fear, uncertainty and doubt, exclusionary licenses, intentionally created incompatibilities and misperception of incompatibilities, blacklists and illegal tying to squash DR-DOS, a competitor to its own MS-DOS which is now owned by Caldera.
The latter company inherited the DR-DOS battle when it bought the operating system from Novell Inc, which in turn absorbed the corpse of DRI.
According to Caldera, Microsoft fought DR-DOS using almost exactly the same anti-competitive techniques the DoJ claims Microsoft used against Netscape Communications Corp's Navigator.
I believe people underestimate the impact DR-DOS has had on us in terms of pricing," Gates noted.