Daedala


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Daedala

Spring
This is the name given to two festivals held in ancient Boeotia, which was a part of Greece, in honor of the reconciliation of Hera and Zeus. According to the myth, Hera and Zeus quarreled and Hera went away to Euboea and refused to return to his bed. To trick her into coming back and on the advice of Cithaeron, Zeus dressed up a carved oak-trunk to resemble a bride and let it be known that he planned to marry Plataea, the daughter of Asopus. Hera was so angry she tore the clothes from the statue, discovered the deception, and was so pleased that the two were reconciled.
The Little Daedala, held every six years, involved going to an ancient oak grove and cutting down trees for images. Every 59 or 60 years the Great Daedala was held, and all Boeotia joined in the celebration. All the images that had been collected over the years during the Little Daedala were carried to the top of Mt. Cithaeron, where they were burned on an altar along with sacrifices to Zeus and Hera.
SOURCES:
DictFolkMyth-1984, p. 273
NewCentClassHandbk-1962, p. 356
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