daguerreotype

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daguerreotype

one of the earliest photographic processes, in which the image was produced on iodine-sensitized silver and developed in mercury vapour

Daguerreotype

 

the first commercially developed and widely used photographic process, now only of historical interest. The daguerreotype was invented in the 1830’s by L. J. Daguerre on the basis of experiments by N.Niepce. Information on the invention of the daguerreotype was made public in 1839, which is regarded as the year of the invention of photography.

daguerreotype

[də′ger·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A photograph produced on a silver plate or a copper plate coated with silver sensitized by the action of iodine; after exposure of the plate in a camera, a latent image is developed by use of mercury vapor.
References in periodicals archive ?
10) These daguerrotypes were perfect exhibits of their craft.
But the deep pleasure of collecting daguerrotypes is to be found in the romance which lies behind what you see when you open the tiny embossed lid.
Certainly, it is an inspiration for anybody who loves strange and beautiful things, therefore, if I have the opportunity to purchase daguerrotypes in the coming months I shall attempt to do so while prices are still, on the whole, below pounds 40 - and I advise you to do the same.
The American writer, David Deitcher, has thrown a fascinating new slant upon the American daguerrotype in terms of the social anthropology these beautiful little images of men and women long dead represent to us today.
The dawn of photography: French daguerrotypes, 1839-1855.
Although the authors do not mention the fact, he provided Cole with an inventory and daguerrotypes, which must have helped convince him of the collection's worth.