Dahomeans

Dahomeans

 

a people inhabiting the southern and central regions of the Republic of Dahomey. They number about 1.3 million (1967, estimate). Most Dahomeans belong to the Fon tribes (the eastern Ewe), and their language is of the Kwa group of the Guinean languages. The majority of Dahomeans have preserved their ancient tribal beliefs; some practice Islam or Christianity. The principal occupation is agriculture (corn, yams, manioc, sweet potatoes, oil-palm products, peanuts, coffee, and cotton). Long before the arrival of European colonialists, the Dahomeans had created a relatively high culture. Artistic crafts, such as the carving of wood and ivory, were well developed, as were art and folklore.

REFERENCES

Narody Afriki, Moscow, 1954.
References in periodicals archive ?
The history of slave procurement by former Dahomeans is thereby 'expurgated' .
The ceremony date corresponds with the "traditional calendrical date for Dahomean families to worship their ancestors at home" and was conceived of as a way to unite local Vodun groups from all over Benin "to worship the long departed slaves as objects of a transnational form of ancestor worship" (Sutherland 1999:202).
Enslaved Dahomeans brought Vodun to Brazil, Cuba, and Haiti by contributing to the birth of new religions such as Candomble, Santeria, and Voodoo in the Americas.
The colored bas-reliefs decorating the walls of the palaces constitute a visual narrative illustrating events that marked the history of the Dahomean dynasties.
Among the descendants of slaves there are not only descendants of former slaves sent to the Americas (especially Brazil) who returned to Dahomey but also descendants of slaves who remained on Dahomean soil.
Unlike the Slave Route Project, "Ouidah 92" was perceived as a project unifying different groups and as an initiative that could eventually allow the descendants of the Dahomean royal family to obtain political gains without emphasizing the debate about the Atlantic slave trade past (Tall 1995).
Despite the idea of a path and the passing of time proposed by the Slaves' Route, the various sculptures depicting the voduns of Dahomean kings do not appear in chronological order.
In Floodtide, for example, Ross Parry allows himself to become an unwilling partner in the crimes of Morgan Brittany; and in The Dahomean, the protagonist's fate is to be sold into slavery, despite his authority and wealth.