Dalmatian


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Dalmatian

(dălmā`shən), breed of hardy, strong-bodied nonsporting dognonsporting dog,
classification used by breeders and kennel clubs to designate dogs that may formerly have been bred to hunt or work but that are now raised chiefly as house pets and companions.
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 probably developed in the Austrian province of Dalmatia (now Croatia) several hundred years ago. It stands from 19 to 23 in. (48.3–58.4 cm) high at the shoulder and weighs from 35 to 50 lb (15.9–22.7 kg). Its short, dense, hard coat is glossy white with black or dark-brown spots. Long associated with horses and valued for its speed, endurance, and dependable nature, the Dalmatian has also been called the coach dog and the firehouse dog. In addition to its historical service as protector and companion to carriages, it has also successfully assumed many other roles, e.g., sentinel, draft animal, shepherd, sporting dog, and circus performer. Today it is largely raised as a companion and pet. See dogdog,
carnivorous, domesticated wolf (Canis lupus familiaris) of the family Canidae, to which the jackal and fox also belong. The family Canidae is sometimes referred to as the dog family, and its characteristics, e.g.
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.

Dalmatian

 

a language of the Romance group of the Indo-European family; spoken on the Dalmatian coast during the Middle Ages. It survived until the end of the 19th century. when the last of its speakers died off.

Dalmatian

a large breed of dog having a short smooth white coat with black or (in liver-spotted dalmatians) brown spots
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite these findings from its own committee, the AKC board voted in November to defer a decision until after June 2011, when a vote of the Dalmatian Club of America's membership would be held.
The rumor is that Dalmatians are kept at firehouses because they're deaf, and therefore, the siren doesn't bother their ears or scare them like it would other dogs.
Minti got her big break after Greg, who had worked on the first dalmatian adaptation, told producers of the sequel, which starred Ioan Gruffudd, Glenn Close and Gerard Depardieu, he owned dalmatians.
Editor Dempsey regrets (8), as will most readers, the absence of Francesco Laurana, one of the supreme talents to emerge from the Dalmatian shores during the period.
Although he wrote Italian and Latin verse and translated Ovid, he also incorporated popular Dalmatian lyrics into his chief work, Ribanje i ribarsko prigovaranje (1555; "Fishing and Fishermen's Talk"), a pastoral and philosophic poem.
A discovery was made at its Dalmatian exploration well with a bottom hole location in De Soto Canyon Block 48, while its Manhattan exploration well located in Lloyd Ridge 511 was unsuccessful and has been plugged and abandoned.
In the same issue, Don Patterson wrote about heritable cardiac disease, and Bob Schaible told his remarkable story about the Dalmatian x Pointer cross and the back crosses that were uric acid stone-free but still looked identical to Dalmatians phenotypically.
She said: "Some dalmatian owners don't know about this genetic problem, so they may notice their dog isn't urinating right, leave it for a couple of days, and then the bladder bursts.
A Dalmatian has given birth to a rare litter of 18 puppies - just over a year after she produced 16.
Among the worshippers was Elin Moss with her dalmatian Leo.
Splash, the 13-year-old Dalmatian, has a condition that behaves like arthritis of the spine.