Elizabeth Taylor

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Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor
Birthday
BirthplaceHampstead Garden Suburb, London, England, UK
Died
NationalityBritish-American
Occupation
Actress, social activist

Taylor, Elizabeth,

1932–2011, Anglo-American film actress, b. London. Regarded as one of the world's most beautiful women, Taylor went from child star and typical teenager roles to a series of ladylike roles and finally to playing worldly, sometimes shrewish women. She appeared in more than 50 films, and won Academy Awards for her work in Butterfield 8 (1960) and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966). Her other films include National Velvet (1944), A Place in the Sun (1951), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), Cleopatra (1963), and The Mirror Crack'd (1979). She also had leading roles on Broadway in The Little Foxes (1981) and Private Lives (1983). Taylor was married nine times, twice to Richard BurtonBurton, Richard,
1925–84, British actor, b. Pontrhydfen, Wales; his original name was Richard Jenkins. A dark, introspective actor with a splendid speaking voice, Burton specialized in portraying conflicted, frequently tormented, men.
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, with whom she co-starred in many films. She was active in raising money for AIDS research, and was made a Dame Commander, Order of the British Empire, in 2000.

Bibliography

See her autobiography (1965); biographies by C. D. Heymann (1995) and D. Spoto (1995); study by M. G. Lord (2012).


Taylor, Elizabeth,

1912–1975, English novelist and short-story writer. Born Elizabeth Coles, she married John Taylor in 1936. She wrote a dozen novels and numerous short stories. In language that is precise, witty, and understated, her novels deftly detail the everyday lives of middle-class and upper-class Englishwomen, often beginning in the period immediately before or after World War I. Sensitive to the disappointments and frustrations of her characters, she is nonetheless ruthless in exposing their delusions and vanities. Her first novel, At Mrs. Lippincote's (1945), was followed by such works as A View of the Harbour (1947), A Game of Hide and Seek (1951), Angel (1957), The Soul of Kindness (1964), and The Wedding Group (1968). Her short-story collections include Hester Lily (1954), A Dedicated Man (1965), and the anthology Dangerous Calm (1995).

Bibliography

See biographies by F. Leclercq (1985), N. H. Reeve (2008), and N. Beauman (2009); N. H. Reeve, ed., Elizabeth Taylor: A Centenary Celebration (2012).

Taylor, Elizabeth

(1932–  ) movie actress; born in London, England. Just before World War II, the Taylors (who were American) returned to the U.S.A. Groomed by her mother to be a movie star, she made her screen debut in There's One Born Every Minute (1942) and already showed her star quality in National Velvet (1944). After a series of relatively light roles, she parlayed her beauty and popularity into an increasingly serious acting career, and although her first Oscar—best actress, in Butterfield 8 (1960)—was voted for sentimental reasons (she had just survived a major illness), her second—for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) – was well deserved. Her private life, meanwhile, became as theatrical as her roles—she would marry seven men, including Richard Burton (twice)—and her treatment for alcohol addiction, her weight problems, and her propensity for expensive jewelry and tough talk made her the epitome of the old-fashioned Hollywood celebrity whose every move was reported. In the 1980s she appeared on stage and on television and then took on a new role as outspoken advocate of AIDS sufferers.
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