Damietta


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Damietta:

see DumyatDumyat
or Damietta
, city (1986 pop. 89,069), capital of Dumyat governorate, N Egypt, on Lake Manzala near the Mediterranean Sea. It is a manufacturing and trade center. Its products include glassware; cotton, silk, and rayon textiles; and processed rice and fish.
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, Egypt.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Damietta boat had been deliberately sunk four days earlier by smugglers off the coast of Malta.
Noble Energy, the operating lead investor in Israel's offshore fields and its Israeli partners would pay the LNG plant's owners a liquefaction fee and special royalty for the export of the super-cooled methane liquid to the markets of the Damietta venture.
Egypt's second most important trading port (where a free industrial zone had been growing rapidly), Damietta lies about 50 km north-west of Port Sa'id.
Islamists also took to the streets in the Suez Canal city of Ismailia, Nile Delta's Damietta, Upper Egypt's Minya and Fayoum.
The Damietta plant is considered one of the most energy efficient methanol plants in the world.
Salamat discovery is located around 75 kilometres north of Damietta city and only 35 kilometres to the North West of Temsah offshore facilities.
Eight more were reportedly killed in Damietta, and four in Ismailia.
Summary: Cairo - The continuing crises of the Mopco plant in Damietta, triggered by popular protests fearful of harmful environmental effects, seem to have reached a cul-de-sac, despite governmental efforts and a court ruling recommending the reopening of the plant.
The first train came on stream in late 2004 and the first shipment left Damietta in January 2005.
Cargo operations at Egypt's Alexandria and Damietta ports have come to a standstill as widespread unrest keeps key staff from work and throws the economy into turmoil, shipping sources said.
One in Damietta, that produces about 750 million cubic feet a day, and the other one in Rashid, producing 900 million cubic feet a day.
Here though the author moves beyond the Middle Ages, and in the second half of Saint Francis and the Sultan, he extends his survey from the fourteenth to the twenty-first century, all the while remaining focused on representations of a particular event in Francis's life: his meeting at Damietta in September 1219 with the Ayubbid Sultan of Egypt, al-Malik al-Kamil Naser al-Din.