dandelion

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dandelion

[Eng. form of Fr.,=lion's tooth], any plant of the genus Taraxacum of the family Asteraceae (asteraster
[Gr.,=star], common name for the Asteraceae (Compositae), the aster family, in North America, name for plants of the genus Aster, sometimes called wild asters, and for a related plant more correctly called China aster (Callistephus chinensis
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 family), perennial herbs of wide distribution in temperate regions. The dandelion has a rosette of deep-toothed leaves (the name is usually attributed to this) and a bright yellow flower followed in fruit by a round head of white down, an adaptation for wind distribution of the seedlike fruits. The common dandelion (T. officinale) is native to Europe but widely naturalized. Although it is considered in the N United States chiefly as a lawn pest because of the easily dispersed seeds and the deep root, it is also cultivated both for medicine and for food. The young leaves resemble chicory and are used for salad greens and as a potherb, especially in Europe. The roots may be roasted and used as a coffee substitute. The flower heads are utilized for dandelion wine and are good forage for bees. In medicine the roots have been dried and used chiefly as a bitter tonic and laxative. The Russian dandelion (T. kok-saghyz) has been cultivated for the milky juice typical of the genus, as a source of rubber. Dandelions are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.

dandelion

traditional symbol of flirtation. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 413]

dandelion

symbol of grief. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 413]
See: Grief

dandelion

1. a plant, Taraxacum officinale, native to Europe and Asia and naturalized as a weed in North America, having yellow rayed flowers and deeply notched basal leaves, which are used for salad or wine: family Asteraceae (composites)
2. any of several similar related plants
References in periodicals archive ?
For years children have for years been picking the white seed-heads of dandelions and blowing off the seeds in an attempt to tell the time.
Like dandelions, the false dandelion is also edible, leaving a bitter aftertaste.
FARMERS and gardeners across Wales are today being urged by conservationists not to pull up one of their biggest pests - dandelions - because they are a vital early spring bloom that can help to save bees and aid food production, naturally.
The regions where dandelions can be cultivated are much larger than the so called "rubber belt.
He found a patch of purple clover and yellow dandelions.
Because Woolfred loves dandelions so much, at first he cannot accept that whenever he eats them, he gets very sick in his tummy.
Dutch biologist Ingrid van der Meer is often met with disbelief when she talks about her work on dandelions and how the plant could secure the future of road transport.
Dandelions are also a surprisingly good source of bone-strengthening calcium.
Initial benchtop trials have demonstrated that rubber--can be extracted from Ohio-grown rubber dandelions, which have been given the trade name Buckeye Gold.
ALBION'S visit to Cardiff tomorrow is hard game to predict but one thing you can pretty much bank on - there won't be any dandelions on the pitch.
Boss Chris Bonnett said: "While plants such as buttercups and dandelions may seem like pests when they crop up in the middle of a lawn, if they are cultivated in a flower bed they can look beautiful and really enhance a garden.
This time he uses the dandelions, the symbol of better things; imagination and strength, to wish his fears away.