Danelaw


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Danelaw

(dān`lô'), originally the body of law that prevailed in the part of England occupied by the Danes after the treaty of King AlfredAlfred,
849–99, king of Wessex (871–99), sometimes called Alfred the Great, b. Wantage, Berkshire. Early Life

The youngest son of King Æthelwulf, he was sent in 853 to Rome, where the pope gave him the title of Roman consul.
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 with Guthrum in 886. It soon came to mean also the area in which Danish law obtained; according to the treaty, the boundary between England and Danelaw ran "up the Thames, and then up the Lea … to its source, then straight to Bedford and then up the Ouse to Watling Street." The Danelaw comprised four main regions: Northumbria; the areas around and including the boroughs of Lincoln, Nottingham, Derby, Leicester, and Stamford; East Anglia; and the SE Midlands. Though the English kings soon brought the Danelaw back under their rule, they did not attempt to interfere with the laws and customs of the area, many of which survived until after the Norman Conquest.

Bibliography

See D. Whitelock, The Norman Conquest: its Setting and Impact (1968); F. M. Stenton, The Free Peasantry of the Northern Danelaw (1926, repr. 1969) and Anglo-Saxon England (3d ed. 1971).

Danelaw

, Danelagh
the northern, central and eastern parts of Anglo-Saxon England in which Danish law and custom were observed
References in periodicals archive ?
After this discussion the author moves away from the higher administrative organization and examines society at the level of farms and villages, concentrating on the status and role of the ceorl, the socio-economic structure of the Danelaw, the different types and sizes of tenements, and the stratification, levels of freedom and various obligations of the landholders.
old Danelaw territory), which he has worked into a poetical framework akin to 'the Ancient Metrical Romance'.
the English people, particularly the Anglo-Saxons and their Viking allies, chafed under the tyranny of the Norman King John, and they looked for leadership to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Stephen Langton, of Lincolnshire, a Viking settlement north of the Danelaw.
Changes in our understanding of Danelaw place-name etymology over the course of the twentieth century are charted, with key works such as those by Erik Bjorkman and Kenneth Cameron summarized in considerable detail.
58) Jacqueline Simpson argues that the tradition of the draugar survives in the English stories courtesy of the descendants of Scandinavian settlers in what was once the Danelaw, the area of England occupied and settled by the Vikings during the ninth century.
There, under the influence of the independent attitudes of the Danelaw, a quasi-legal system inherited from the Vikings, the first real class of "freemen" was able to thrive, giving rising to so-called "English individualism," which C.
The hall is therefore of Viking Age date, very close to the time when King Alfred of Wessex and the Danish chieftain Guthrum consented to the Treaty of Wedmore (AD 886-90), the agreement that confirmed peace between their warring armies while also recognizing the autonomy of the Danelaw in England.
Paula Scott, 48, who rides mother Ariel and Laura Green, 14, who rides son Danelaw Aquavit, or Billy for short, have qualified for the Royal London Horse Show at Grantham in September.
46 Of the five key fortified towns of the Viking Danelaw, four became English county towns - Leicester, Lincoln, Nottingham and Derby.
Kings Eadwig and Edgar had kept England fairly safe from the assaults of the Vikings between 955 and 975, but, despite the relative peace, there was always a fear that the Danes in northern England, the Viking-controlled region known as the Danelaw, could either invade or ally with incoming new raiders.
This eastern area of England came to be known as the Danelaw, but Guthrum and the other chiefs recognized Alfred as their overlord.
Many of these same Norse termini technici may have had an impact, less well documented, on the Old English of the Danelaw, an impact strengthened by the later import of Norman French to Britain, and then made newly evident in the emergence of Middle English from this complex linguistic mix.